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These Discontinued Cars Will Stun True Auto Fans If They See Them

Vukasin Herbez August 9, 2022

Photo Credit: Silodrome

Apollo 3500 GT

This car is known under several names, including Vetta Ventura and Griffith GT. However, the project started as Apollo 3500, and it was the brainchild of Californian engineer Milt Brown who wanted to build a proper sports car to rival the European exotics. With the help of Intermeccanica founder Frank Reisner, the Apollo project started to take shape in the form of a handsome coupe powered by a 3.5-liter Buick V8 (via Silodrome).

Photo Credit: Silodrome

The production was later moved to Texas and renamed Vetta Ventura, but the car stayed the same. However, it got an upgraded engine in the form of a 4.9-liter Buick V8. Production started in 1962 and lasted until 1965.

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Bradley GT

The Bradley GT was a typical ’70s kit car company that produced cars built on VW Beetle floor pans with flat-four air-cooled engines and suspension. Despite the fact it doesn’t count as a sports car configuration, the Bradley GT was fast since the bodies were light and owners often decided to tune the engines (via Makes That Didnt Make It).

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The Bradley GT was an interesting-looking sports coupe that sold as a kit or as a fully built car, customized to customers’ specifications. It was one of the typical ’70s DIY models with metallic paint, chrome wheels, and gullwing doors, all of which added to the appeal.

Photo Credit: Auto WP

10. Bricklin SV-1

The SV-1 was the brainchild of automotive entrepreneur Malcolm Bricklin. It was made in Canada from 1974 to 1975 and less than 3000 examples were produced. For a short while, the SV-1 was marketed as the best and most advanced American sports car. However, as soon as the first cars started rolling from the assembly line, it was clear that the SV-1 was not as good as people expected it to be (via Silodrome).

Photo Credit: Auto WP

The idea was to produce a safe and fast sports car as the name SV-1 (Safety Vehicle One) suggested. Bricklin designed the car with big bumpers, numerous additional features, warring sensors, power Gullwing doors, no cigarette lighters, an integrated roll cage, and other aspects making it heavy and not very agile.

Photo Credit: Auto WP

Cheetah

The global success of Shelby Cobra inspired many American race car builders to build a similar car that could compete on an international level. From this perspective, nobody came close to beating the Cobra, but Bill Thomas, a famous Chevrolet tuner and race car builder, was a serious candidate (via Car and Driver).

Photo Credit: Auto WP

A unique lightweight chassis was featured along with a small block V8 moved as far back as possible. A light fiberglass body covered all of this. Despite some overheating problems, the Cheetah was a remarkable performer and won some lower-rank races and even the 1968 SCCA championship.

Photo Credit: Auto WP

Bosley Mk1 GT

Like many car enthusiasts before or after him, Richard Bosley had a dream of building his own sports car. As a very talented person but with no engineering or design education, Bosley started the construction of the Mk1 GT in his garage. In 1953, he managed to complete the car. The result was an amazingly modern sports coupe that featured tube chassis and tuned Chrysler’s Hemi engine with around 300 HP (via Concept Carz).

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The Bosley Mk1 GT was a surprisingly capable coupe with fantastic performance compared to the cars of the period. For some reason, Bosley never intended to start regular production of the Mk1 GT.

Photo Credit: Flickr

7. Oldsmobile Achieva SCX W41

Despite the very limited sales of the original W41 Cutlass in 1991, Oldsmobile knew that the 2.3-liter four-cylinder had the potential to be more than just a footnote in Oldsmobile’s history. So, for the 1992 and 1993 model years, Oldsmobile offered the SCX W41 model, the last W-named performance version ever built by Oldsmobile (via AC).

Photo Credit: Flickr

The SCX W41 was heavily based on the previous model and featured the same 190 HP 2.3-liter engine, which revved to 7,200 rpm. The design and interior equipment got better, and there were some changes to suspension and brakes. The five-speed manual gearbox developed especially for this model was the most significant improvement.

Photo Credit: Auto WP

Panoz Roadster

Successful in racing, Panoz was one of those brands which offered a lot of racing technologies in street-legal vehicles. That made them favorites with fans of performance driving (via Motor Biscuit).

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The Roadster model debuted in the early ’90s and as the modern-day version of the legendary Shelby Cobra. Panoz used a lot of Ford Mustang components including the engine, drivetrain, and suspension, which meant that the Roadster had 300 HP and brutal performance.

Photo Credit: Auto WP

Guldstrand Corvette C4

Dick Guldstrand was a household name to all Corvette fans as one of the best-known Corvette racers and tuners. In the early ’90s, Chevrolet introduced the mighty ZR1 Vette but Guldstrand felt it wasn’t enough (via LSX Mag).

Photo Credit: Auto WP

So his shop presented the Guldstrand GS 90 with 475 HP and a host of other upgrades. The GS 90 production was minimal, with some sources stating that only about 25 cars. However, they are easily recognizable due to custom bodywork and paint jobs.

Photo Credit: Auto WP

International Harvester Scout

International Harvester is a well-known American company that makes trucks and agricultural machinery. However, from the ’50s to the early ’80s, International was producing two SUV models. The Scout was a small and very usable off-road SUV with choices of engines ranging from 2.5-liter straight four to 4.4-liter V8 (via Maxim).

Photo Credit: Auto WP

Also, it came with a removable hard top, which meant that every Scout was also a convertible, and it also had a fold-down windshield. The first models were pretty basic and used by nature lovers, hunters, and forest patrols. Still, the second generation introduced a more luxurious Scout with more options, better engines, and exterior trim.

Photo Credit: Mecum

Jeepster Commando

The Jeepster Commando is a Jeep sub-brand that was in production between 1966 and 1973. It was an upscale version of those pure off-road models that featured removable hardtops and a small truck bed behind the front seats. It was a practical model that drivers could use for cruising, as well as carrying smaller items and going off-road (via Motor Trend).

Photo Credit: Mecum

Buyers had a wide selection of engines, from small inline four and six cylinders to V6 and V8 engines. AMC produced most of the engines because they owned the Jeep brand at the time. Also, Buick produced a 225 V6 known as the Dauntless V6.

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Pierce Arrow

One of the most famous forgotten American luxury brands is Pierce-Arrow. The company started as a truck and engine manufacturer in Buffalo, New York, in 1901. Pierce-Arrow soon moved to luxury models with great success. Right from the start, the company developed a specific style of its cars with flowing lines, headlights incorporated into front fenders, and wild color choices (via Motor-Car).

Photo Credit: Auto WP

But the Great Depression of the late ’20s and early ’30s killed the brand, and this legendary company ceased to exist in 1938. Simply, a small independent company like this couldn’t survive the big recession.

Photo Credit: Flickr

American Mercedes

No, we are not talking about Mercedes products currently made in the Mercedes Alabama factory; we are talking about a separate brand made in 1904 in Long Island, New York.

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As you can guess, American Mercedes started producing cars under license from Mercedes-Benz Germany. Soon it started developing its versions of vehicles. However, the venture wasn’t successful, and in 1907, American Mercedes closed (via Supercars).

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