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Buy These Future Classic Investment Cars Before It’s Too Late

Vukasin HerbezOctober 14, 2022

For decades, the classic car market concentrated on models from the ’50s and ’60s and even pre-war cars. These are glorious machines, but they are out of place in modern traffic. Most of those models are also very expensive, with no or little aftermarket support in terms of spare parts. However, these days, cars from the ’80s, ’90s, and early 2000s are getting attention from collectors as investment cars.

People are looking for the cars they wanted in adolescence. Also, intelligent collectors are looking for the next desirable models that will fetch big prices in the future. So we broke down 40 cars you should pay attention to and buy while they are still relatively affordable.

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Ford Mustang SVT Cobra

Inspired by the wild SVT Cobra R from the ’90s, the 2003 model was not named R since it wasn’t such limited production. It was also available to the general public rather than just racing drivers and private teams. This SVT Cobra was an essential model for Mustang mythology since it featured two firsts. One was the first factory supercharged engine and the other was an independent rear suspension. SVT took the standard 4.6-liter block and mounted different heads and superchargers to get 390 HP and 390 lb.-ft of torque (via Car and Driver).

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The car’s 0 to 60 mph time took only 4.7 seconds, making the SVT Cobra a drag strip terror. Ford offered this model in 2003 and 2004, producing around 20,000 in both coupe and convertible forms. Despite being almost 20 years old, those cars are still desirable and will only increase in value as time goes on.

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Dodge Viper

This legendary sports muscle car was born in 1992 and immediately became an American icon. It had a monster V10 engine in the front, a sleek and aggressive body style, rear-wheel drive, and not much to protect you from being killed by this car’s sheer power and wild nature (via Car and Driver).

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Even if the Viper didn’t have fancy and advanced automatic transmission with a dual-clutch system and lightning-fast shifts, it was still brutally fast and capable of beating much more expensive European exotics. The 8.2-liter, 645 HP V10 engine sent this beast from 0 to 60 mph in only 3.8 seconds. Will it be a classic soon? It will.

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Honda S2000

The S200 was a true driver’s car with all the essential features like lightweight construction, ideal weight distribution, and razor-sharp handling in an elegant open-top package. Under the hood was a 2.0 or 2.2-liter four-cylinder engine with 240 HP. This was the car’s main selling point. This little gem of an engine featured a 9000 rpm red line, and four valves per cylinder. It also had the famous Honda V-Tec system, which provided all the power at high RPMs and an excellent screaming sound (via Honda).

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During its decade-long production run, Honda sold over 110,000 of these fast little roadsters. You’ll be pleased to know that you can find one today for relatively cheap. Look for unmodified examples since stock S2000s will be the most sought-after.

Toyota MR2
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Toyota MR2

The second generation of Toyota MR2, which lasted into the ’90s, was an exciting sports car. It was also and a true early ’90s icon with a mid-mounted engine and rear-wheel drive. The version you should look for is a 1.6-liter supercharged model called SC (supercharger), which delivers 145 HP and 140 lb.-ft of torque (via Toyota Nont).

Toyota MR2
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Even though those power output figures don’t sound powerful today, the MR2 could accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in just seven seconds, which is still respectable. The prices for well-preserved examples are still affordable and the MR2 is tons of fun.

1997 BMW 8 Series - BMW
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BMW 8-Series

Born in 1989, the E31 8-Series was BMW’s flagship coupe with V8 and V12 power, sublime performance, exclusivity, and style. It was a big step up from the old 6-Series in terms of technology, design, and power. When the 8-Series was presented, it was considered one of the best models in its class.

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Today, almost 30 years after the first 8-Series rolled off the assembly line, this car still looks modern and performs just as well. Never too popular or common, especially on the American market, the E31 is still under the radar of most enthusiasts. This means you should get one now while they are still affordable (via E31).

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Chevrolet C/K “Square Body”

Colloquially called “Square Body” for its boxy design, the third generation C/K featured a computer-designed body with more space. The truck was bigger due to the new platform, revised suspension, and tougher axles. Customers had numerous cab configurations, special editions, engine options, and details to choose from. This made the third-generation C/K one of the best trucks in the world at the time (via Driving Line).

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Produced from 1973 to 1991 in the USA, this model was made in Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and South Korea. During its long production run, Chevrolet introduced a diesel engine as an option. This proved to be a highly popular choice in Europe and South America. Today, most of these trucks are rusty. But preserved examples are fetching high prices since people fondly remember them.

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Subaru SVX

Back in the early ’90s, Subaru wanted to enter the sports car market to promote its most significant assets – all-wheel drive and flat-six engines. So, the company hired Italdesign to design a sleek and modern coupe.

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In 1991 the SVX debuted with strange styling, complicated side window patents, sublime handling, and excellent performance. Under the hood was a 3.3-liter flat-six, propelling this rare car to 60 mph in 7.3 seconds. Only about 14.000 were sold in America until 1996. It’s an obscure vehicle, but it will be a valuable one (via Secret Classics).

Jaguar XJS
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Jaguar XJS

Introduced in the mid-1970s, the XJS was a big step for the company. Under the long hood, there was a well-known 3.6-liter six-cylinder and a 5.3-liter V12 engine, which was a better choice if you wanted a full GT experience (via Classics World).

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The XJS was an extremely popular choice, especially in America, where Jaguar sold the majority of the 115,000 cars made. Due to its elegance, power, and speed, the XJS remained in production for incredible 21 years and still is a respectable car in every way. So it’s therefore no surprise that prices are rising each year.

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Jeep Grand Cherokee 5.9 Limited

Today, fast SUVs are nothing special. But in the 1990s, they were extremely rare and obscure. Jeep produced one that will be a collector’s item soon. This was the 1998 5.9 Limited, a one-year, top-of-the-line model equipped with every luxury item Jeep had to offer. It also had the 5.9-liter Magnum V8 with 245 HP (via Motor Trend).

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Although 245 HP doesn’t sound like much today, it was the lofty number for late ’90s SUV standards. The Grand Cherokee 5.9 could be considered a kind of Jeep’s hot rod model before modern SRT versions with powerful Hemi engines. Only 15,000 were delivered and the 5.9 Limited is a definite future classic.

BMW M2 Coupe
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BMW M2

Since the current M3 and M4 models are way up in power, performance, and price, BMW decided to introduce a more affordable but still exhilarating and fast two-door coupe. The M2 is one of the planet’s best driver’s cars. It combines BMW’s driving dynamics, proven German quality, and M Power heritage. It’s also a modern-day equivalent of the legendary 2002 Turbo (via Evo).

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As you probably expect, the result is fantastic, and the M2 is a true Autobahn missile of the highest order, with 4.1 seconds from 0 to 60 mph and a top speed of 168 mph. As a nod to classic performance cars, the new M2 is also available as a six-speed manual. This is the version you should take if you consider yourself a true car enthusiast as it’s certainly a future classic.

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Ford Taurus SHO

Back in the late ’80s, Ford caused a revolution by introducing the Taurus model. This was the first truly modern American sedan that ditched the heavy ladder-type chassis and big engines. The SHO went in a different direction with a sleek and aerodynamic body, new technology, and front-wheel drive. The Taurus sold in volumes, but the most interesting edition is the SHO version (via Motor Trend).

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The SHO (Super High Output) was the Taurus lineup’s performance model, featuring a Yamaha-sourced 3.0-liter high-revving V6 with 220 HP. This doesn’t sound much today, but for 1989 it was a pretty lofty figure, and the performance was outstanding, with just 6.7 seconds to 60 mph. On the outside, Taurus SHO looked like any other regular Taurus and only the badge on the back revealed its true nature.

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Toyota Landcruiser J60

It is insane that good examples of the J60 series Landcruiser are bringing north of $30,000 today, but this is the reality of the collector’s car market. The classic ’80s SUV was affordable not long ago, but now the prices are getting out of hand. However, the restoration projects are still somewhat cheap, and if you have the means to perform them, you should consider finding an ’80s Landcruiser.

Land Cruiser | Corsetti Cruisers
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Introduced in 1980 and discontinued in 1989, the J60 was sold worldwide and very popular in America. It combined the ruggedness of the classic FJ40 with a durable 4.2-liter inline six-engine and a bigger, more comfortable body. The combination proved influential and the J60 is now the focus of collectors worldwide (via Silodrome).

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Ford Focus RS

Under the hood of the new Focus RS, there’s a 2.3-liter turbocharged unit that delivers 345 HP to all four wheels. This makes the Focus RS a very capable hot hatch beast. Possessing incredible performance, going from 0 to 60 mph takes only 4.7 seconds and its top speed is 165 mph. This kind of performance deserves special packaging. Simply looking at this furious compact will tell you that this is a genuinely fast Ford (via Car and Driver).

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However, since this model is dead, it’s the perfect time to look for mint examples. It is still relatively new, but surely, we will not see anything like this again. This guarantees that Focus RS will have a classic car status and a bump in pricing.

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Pontiac GTO

The first year for the modern GTO was 2004, and the car met universal praise from the buyers and the car press. The design wasn’t new or aggressive, but the GTO had the muscle car form and street presence. Under the hood was an LS1 5.7-liter V8 with 350 HP and enough performance to be one of the hottest American cars for the 2004 model year (via Edmunds).

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The target sales figure was 18,000, and Pontiac sold almost 14,000, which could be considered a success. Even though this model was killed in 2006, it is the last GTO, and that is why we think the prices will be going up soon.

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Porsche Boxster

Even though the third generation of Porsche’s Boxster is currently in production, we will tell you about the first-generation model, introduced in 1996 and discontinued in 2004. With over 20 years since Porsche introduced this roadster, it is safe to say that the Boxster revolutionized the concept of open top fun car and stood the test of time as a future classic you can own today.

Porsche Boxster
Photo Credit: Auto World

The Boxster’s significant advantage is its layout. While most other cars have front-engine rear-wheel drive construction, the Boxster has a mid-mounted flat-six engine, perfect balance, two trunks, and sublime handling. Since the base 2.5-liter delivers a healthy 200 HP, it makes even the most affordable Boxsters agile, fast, and exciting to drive. That’s especially true if paired with the six-speed manual transmission. If you think that the ’90s Porsche design is cool, this is the roadster for you. For around $10,000, you can find good examples from the late ’90s (via Top Gear).

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Cadillac CTS-V Wagon

Arguably the most interesting Cadillac CTS-V was a second-gen model. Under the hood was a supercharged 6.2-liter V8 with 556 hp making the CTS-V the most potent performance car on the market. Cadillac produced three body styles. The CTS-V could be had as a sedan, a coupe, and, interestingly, as a wagon too.

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The rarest of the three, the CTS-V Wagon shared all mechanic components with the rest of the V-Series models. However, the wagon body style was something Cadillac buyers didn’t expect. The car was still a blast to drive and extremely fast; it was just that most customers turned to sedans or coupes. That is why the CTS-V Wagon is rare and a definitive future collectible. Get yours today while you still can (via Motor Trend).

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Mazda Miata

One of the most successful stories in the car industry is the tale about Mazda’s Miata roadster. This little car changed the world and became the best-selling open-top model in history, passing the 1-million mark in 2013. Nobody expected that the Miata would become so successful and influential when Mazda announced it in the late ’80s. But soon after its introduction, the industry realized that roadsters were coming back and Miata was completely dominating the market (via Road and Track).

Photo Credit: Mazda

The Miata’s secret was simplicity, light weight, and balance. Mazda didn’t try to invent something new. They just copied the basic concept of a classic British roadster, added modern materials and design, and made it dependable and agile. 116 HP from a twin-cam 1.6-liter engine may not sound like much, but in a 2,200 lb. car, it’s more than enough. If you are looking for the most affordable examples, the first-generation Miata can provide many memorable moments for just a few thousand dollars. Don’t forget that many aftermarket options can transform your little Miata into an insanely fast machine if you want to.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

BMW Z3

Roadsters became pretty popular in the ’90s, with the Mazda Miata showing the way. All relevant car companies wanted a piece of the action. BMW did produce numerous convertibles before, but no roadsters. The Z3 was their first. Using the E36 Compact 3-Series platform and rear suspension out of the old E30 model and covering it with a sexy new open-top body, BMW created the first Z3 model. The result was a stylish convertible with two seats, a lineup of potent four and six-cylinder engines, and excellent driving dynamics. The car was significantly more expensive than the Miata but much faster and more luxurious (Via BMW Group Classic).

2000 BMW Z3 - 2001 BMW Z3
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It was one of the best sellers in its class and a benchmark model in the performance and handling department. The Z3 was especially popular in America, and interestingly, it was the first BMW solely produced here in the new South Carolina factory. A future classic for sure.

1995 Porsche 928 - Porsche
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Porsche 928

The 928 was a Gran Turismo coupe with a powerful V8, ideal weight distribution, intelligent suspension, and a space-age design. In contrast to the 911, which still had some VW Beetle cues, the 928 looked like it came from another planet. Even though the early 928s had below 300 HP, the car was fast and made for effortless cruising and driving over continents in comfort, speed, and luxury.

1995 Porsche 928 - Porsche
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For decades, this model was in the shadow of the famous 911, but recently people started realizing just how good those coupes are. And of course, prices started going up (via Porsche).

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Jeep Cherokee XJ

Introduced in 1984, Cherokee (XJ generation) was an enormous success for Jeep. With its boxy-yet elegant-looks, excellent build quality, and many usable features, the second-generation Cherokee was the SUV of the ’80s and a globally successful model.

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Despite being a modern and comfortable vehicle, the Cherokee XJ retained all Jeep characteristics like rugged mechanics, a dependable AWD drive train, and good engines. These all helped it claim the title of one of the best SUVs of all time. In some foreign markets, the Cherokee XJ was in production until 2014 for foreign markets, which shows how good of a car this Jeep was. The XJ is the next big thing since good examples are hard to find as people fondly remember this great vehicle (via Gear Patrol).

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Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS

In 1983, Chevrolet decided to re-introduce the SS trim level on the 1983 model, and the option continued until 1988 with great success. The mid-’80s Monte Carlo was one of the coolest two-door coupes of the period, although the performance wasn’t exhilarating. Under the hood was a 305 V8 with 180 HP mated to a pretty slow automatic transmission (via Monte Carlo SS).

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What the SS lacked in performance, it made up for with looks and reputation. In a five-year production run, Chevrolet built over 180,000 of those sleek coupes. The rising popularity of ’80s coupes also affected this model, but we suggest you look only for stock examples since there are too many crudely modified cars out there.

Alfa Romeo 4C
Photo Credit: Motor Trend

Alfa Romeo 4C

Nobody expected such a car from Alfa, and 4C was kind of a “junior supercar” with a carbon fiber tub, a cramped interior, and a four-cylinder turbocharged engine behind the driver. The result was a fantastically capable little super sports car weighing under 1000 kg, so there is no need for power steering (via Car and Driver).

Alfa Romeo 4c
Photo Credit: Alfa

The heart of the 4C is a tiny, 1.8-liter engine with a turbocharger that delivers 238 HP to the rear wheels. The performance is terrific as you would expect, and 0 to 60 mph is possible in 4.7 seconds while the 4C can top 160 mph. The 4C was available in the US, and its production was very limited, so if you want a supercar with the fuel economy of a compact and power-to-weight ratio of a Formula One car, better hurry up. This pint-sized Italian supercar is bound to be collectible.

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Nissan 300 ZX

One of the best cars in a long line of Z-named Nissan sports coupes was the 300 ZX introduced in 1990 and discontinued in 1996. Car enthusiasts respect this model since the 300 ZX was a proper sports coupe with the technology and performance which could rival much more expensive and exclusive cars. The twin-turbo V6 engine pumped out 300 HP and this ZX could accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in just 5.5 seconds and top 150 mph (via Nissan Global).

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The prices for this model are affordable, and you should look for decent examples with a full service history and no accidents. You can find them cheaper, but it is possible that these will not be as good. Since ’90s Japanese cars are slowly getting more desirable, you better hurry up since the Nissan 300 ZX’s prices could soon go up in the skies.

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Chevrolet Suburban

An interesting thing about the Suburban is that this is the longest-serving nameplate in car history, with the first model under this name introduced in 1935. Right from the start, the Suburban defined itself as a people carrier in a body style that was closer to a minivan of sorts than to a regular wagon or SUV (via Road and Track).

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The all-wheel drive option proved popular during later generations. It became an almost mandatory option for the famous and long-serving 7th generation, which was introduced in 1973 and discontinued in 1991. Since the Square Body trucks got expensive, this affected the Suburbans of similar vintage as well. If you find one that’s not rusty, buy it.

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Ford Mustang GT Fox-Body

The rise in power of domestic cars during the ’80s brought the first actual performance to the Mustang range in almost 20 years. The Fox-body Mustang grew more and more potent with each model year, starting from 175 HP in the 1983 model. By the late ’80s, the venerable 5.0-liter V8 engine was pumping out 225 HP and 300 lb.-ft of torque, translating to reasonably competent 0 to 60 mph times (via Motor Junkie).

This car marked the return to its roots with a robust V8 engine and exciting performance. Also, the late ’80s Fox-body GT was very popular, so they are plentiful today. This makes them an excellent choice for entry-level collectors. On the other hand, the aftermarket for these cars is enormous, so you can modify and make your Fox-body GT even faster, easy and cheap.

Saab 900
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SAAB 900 Turbo

The 900 Turbo was presented at a time when turbocharging was fairly new and only a few models before had it as a regular production item. In fact, in the late ’70s, SAAB was briefly the only non-sports model with an option of a turbocharged engine. The 2.0-liter four-cylinder with forced induction produced 143 HP at first and 185 HP in later versions (via Classic and Sports Car).

Photo Credit: SAAB

Fast-forward 30 years and SAAB is no longer with us, but the spirit of invention and uniqueness of the 900 Turbo still lives on. If you are looking for a usable imported car with a specific design and technology, the 900 Turbo could be the answer. The cars themselves are not expensive, and the turbo engine gives a lot of space for tuning and going well over the 200 HP mark.

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Chevrolet SS

With a 6.2-liter V8, 412 HP, precise steering, and neutral handling, this car rivals Europe’s finest sports sedans. Of course, this is a Holden from Australia but rebadged as Chevrolet and fine-tuned for US customers (via Motor Trend).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Its performance numbers are respectable as a 0 to 60 mph sprint is possible in just 4.7 seconds while the top speed is over 150 mph. The Chevrolet SS is a good proposition for people who need a practical sedan but want a sports car. This is one of the best sleepers on the market since it can blend with the traffic, and nobody can tell that you have 400 HP under your right foot, ready to jump. The Chevrolet SS is a future classic, so grab your example today.

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Toyota 4Runner

Toyota’s answer to the Ford Bronco and Chevrolet K5 Blazer came relatively late in 1984. It followed the same recipe as its competitors: a shortened Hilux truck chassis with a single cabin and a removable hardtop. The 4Runner came in time to battle with the second generations of the Bronco and the K5, and while it obviously couldn’t compete with the two due to lack of V8 power, it gained recognition due to its ruggedness and durability (via Hemmings).

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In all honesty, even without the V8 under the hood, the 4Runner was an excellent SUV for the period and was especially capable in off-road conditions. Today, the palette of inline-four engines is considered the most reliable, so the best way is to try and find these versions, despite the apparent lack of power compared to the V6 models.

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Alfa Romeo Milano V6

If you are looking for an Italian performance sedan on a budget, now’s the time to pick up an excellent example of the Alfa Romeo Milano 3.0 V6.

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The Milano was an elegant four-door model with interesting technical features. It had De Dion rear suspension and a transaxle gearbox which made it handle like a racing car. Along with a three-liter, 200 HP V6 engine, Milano had a pretty good performance and was comparable to BMW 5 Series. A bit of an obscure car but a classic nonetheless (via Motor Trend).

2015 Volkswagen Golf R - Volkswagen Golf GTI
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Volkswagen Golf R32

The 21st century brought many technological innovations, electronic systems, and improvements in construction. So why not implement all that in a hot hatch of the future? This is how the R32 was born in 2003. Volkswagen took the Mk4 body shell and installed the best hardware it had in the early 2000s. That meant the R32 had intelligent all-wheel drive, a 240 HP 3.2-liter V6 engine, a luxury interior, and a host of technology.

Volkswagen Golf R - Volkswagen Golf GTI
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This wasn’t the first AWD hot hatch or the fastest despite its 0 to 60 mph time of 6.4 seconds, but it was the first “Uber” hatch that combined luxury and effortless high-speed cruising with exciting driving dynamics. Also, this was the first hot hatch to use DSG transmission, a standard today in this class. This makes the R32 a definitive future classic and competent everyday car. So buy one now while they are still cheap (via Car Magazine).

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Mercedes SL R129

Introduced in 1989, the fourth generation of Mercedes’ prestigious convertible was a very advanced automobile filled with the latest technology, powerful engines, and creature comforts. With elegant design and the best materials, the SL soon became a must-have car for any successful enthusiast worldwide.

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Quite expensive when new, the R129 SL Roadsters now cost just a fraction of the original price while still retaining the same level of prestige and performance. The most sought-after cars are the 5.0-liter V8 or 6.0-liter V12 units. We would go for V8 models since they are cheaper to buy and run and offer almost the same level of refinement as their V12 cousins.

Foto Credit: Auto WP

Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z

The third-generation Camaro was a well-received and popular car. Still, after a while, buyers wanted more performance and power. Chevrolet delivered that in the form of the legendary IROC-Z version. However, it was more than just an appearance package and a cool name. Under the hood was the 350 V8 with 225 HP in early years and 245 HP in later versions (via Hagerty).

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Chevrolet even offered a cool-looking convertible, the first Camaro rag top in 18 years. For a long time, the IROC-Z was the affordable ’80s muscle car. But recently, prices are starting to pick up as more and more people recognize this model as a true muscle car classic.

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Classic Range Rover

Range Rover was simply an answer to the customers who needed a capable car but not a Spartan off-roader the Defender was. The company didn’t expect much in 1970, but very soon, sales were encouraging, so Range Rover invested in the concept. During the ’80s and early ’90s, the original Range Rover became the bestselling vehicle in its class and an industry legend (via Classic Range Rover).

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The idea of owning a classic Range Rover is appealing. But be ready to search all over the place for good examples at affordable prices. The Range Rover wasn’t the most durable of all classic SUVs. Examples of this car in poor condition are cheap but need a lot, and good models are getting costlier each day.

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Volvo 850 R Wagon

Is there anything more boring in the automotive world than a boxy old Volvo station wagon? Probably not. The typical suburban mom car from the ’90s with loads of space for kids and their stuff. Slow but dependable and dead boring to drive. You can say all that for a regular Volvo 850 Wagon. But the R version introduced in 1996 is entirely different (via Road and Track).

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After the success of the T5 version of the 850 series, which featured a turbocharged engine, Volvo decided to go a step further. It introduced an all-out sleeper machine in the form of the 850 R. Under the hood, the 2.3-liter five-cylinder engine featured a bigger turbo, a different intake system, and electronics. All of which resulted in a respectable 250 HP output.

Corvette Via GM
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Chevrolet Corvette ZR1

The classic C1 to C3 Corvettes are already too expensive for the average car buyer, and the standard C4, despite its excellent handling, may be low on power for some owners. The solution is ZR1, the mighty C4 Corvette, which could outrun most supercars in the early ’90s.

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Under the hood, there was the LT4, a Lotus-engineered V8 engine with 375 HP (later 400 HP), quad-cam heads, and 32 valves. The engine was an engineering marvel and performed exceptionally well. With the beefed-up suspension, gearbox, and a pair of extra wide rear tires, the Corvette ZR1 could accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds. This made it one of the fastest cars of the era and a true modern classic today (via GM Authority).

Photo Credit: Audi Data

Volkswagen Corrado VR6

The Corrado was a replacement for the popular Sirocco coupe and it was much more. Volkswagen wanted something closer to Porsche 944 in terms of styling and performance than another sporty-looking Golf derivate. So, the Corrado had a revised front-wheel-drive platform, unique suspension and brakes, a new and aggressive-looking exterior design, and an exciting and powerful VR6 engine option.

Photo Credit: Audi Data

The VR6 was a high-revving 2.9-liter V6 engine mounted to a close-ratio 5-speed manual. It delivered 190 HP, a pretty high number for the early ’90s when Corrado was on sale in the USA. The VR6 could accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in 6.9 seconds. That was pretty respectable and made this little coupe one of the best-driving cars of the period (via Volkswagen).

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BMW M5 E39

The BMW M5, built from 1998 to 2003, is widely considered one of the best performance sedans. It is the best M5 model and a prime example of a German muscle car. You’re probably asking what this model did to receive such high praise from car fans and the motoring press. The heart of the car was a glorious S62 4.9-liter V8 engine with 400 HP. It sent all of its power to the rear wheels through a six-speed manual, the only transmission choice (via The Car Investor).

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The result was the ultimate driver’s sedan and instant classic, which could jump to 60 mph in 4.8 seconds and top 155 mph (electronically limited). Today, the E39 M5 is still obtainable, but hurry up since prices will go stratospheric soon.

Photo Credit: GM

Cadillac Allante

The Allante was a competitor of the Mercedes SL convertible, and it was a two-seat luxury convertible with Italian styling by Pininfarina, a Northstar V8 engine, and front-wheel drive. Quite an unusual combination, but the car looked and performed very well. Even the production process was specific and actual fabrication was done in Italy in the Pininfarina factory. The vehicles were shipped to the US by jet, which affected the final product cost (via Auto Evolution).

Cadillac Allanté - Car
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The Allante stayed in production until 1993. 21,000 cars found buyers. The car proved too expensive to produce and the factory allegedly lost money on every example they made. But today, this piece of American-Italian engineering and design can be yours for around $10,000, which is a steal.

Photo Credit: GM

2002 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

The C5 Corvette brought several improvements and a fresh design. Under the sleek fiberglass body were a new chassis, a new 350 HP engine, and a transaxle gearbox. It meant that the whole transmission assembly was moved to the rear axle, which improved the balance and handling (via Car and Driver).

Photo Credit: GM

The Z06 got its name from a particular version of the 1963 Corvette. The modern Z06 was an amplified base Corvette with 385 to 405 HP from a high-revving 5.7-liter V8 engine, lightweight body, sticky Goodyear tires, and stiffer suspension. The car handled perfectly and looked apart with different roof lines and wheels. Even today, 20 years later, the Corvette Z06 C5 is a tough car to beat on the street. This is why it will be expensive soon.

Photo Credit: Pinterest

Jaguar XJ6

The XJ6 was born in 1968 and there was nothing similar on the market back then. The XJ6 was a low, sleek, and elegant sedan, equipped with powerful straight six engines and a 5.3-liter V12 for the most demanding customers. This was the first car that perfectly blended luxury with sports appeal. The signature shape lasted up to 2009 through eight different generations.

Photo Credit: Pinterest

In all its iterations, Jaguar XJ6 was always a popular luxury car in America. It means there are plenty of those around. Some of the early models are pretty cheap and this could be the perfect starter classic for you if you’re into legendary British motors (via Octane Magazine).

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