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Real Drivers Share Stories Of Getting Ripped Off By Car Dealers

Cameron EittreimApril 13, 2021

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3: Junk Replacement Parts

Parts departments of the auto dealerships are notorious for ripping customers off. Qucikquestionawe revealed what one dealership did with new parts. “Dealership parts department would put a bunch of boxes of the replacement parts that they’d install on the cars. Like the boxes that the shocks, brake pads, etc came in. When I opened the trunk sure enough all the empty boxes were in there.

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“Suggesting that they had replaced all of those components in the car. When I check those components, they were all old. The shock absorbers were old. Brake pads barely had any life in them. And so on. They probably had at least a hundred vehicles on their lot, and every single one had some boxes in the trunk or back seat. Most of them were probably never actually worked on.”

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2: 1997 Subaru Legacy GT

Subaru’s Legacy GT is the unsung hero of the Subaru community. It’s a sedan that offers great performance for the price. longlive289s talked about when his purchase went bad. “Bought a ’97 Leggy GT years ago in May with 150k. Clean car, no mods, bright red. However, it was a kinda weird part of Seattle and the car had some quirks. Removed badges (checked the VIN and still matched), one yellow fog light and one white, few other parts replaced

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“But were original OEM parts so seemed fine. Guy was getting rid of it for $5k with a rebuilt engine 10k miles ago, he had some leg issues so couldn’t drive a manual anymore. He originally was from Vegas and had the work done down there and had the car driven up to Seattle Told him to get me a copy of the rebuild invoice and notes and I’d buy it. His shop emailed my invoice and notes. So I bought it.”

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1: 1999 Volvo S70

Volvo’s S70 has always been an exceptionally well-appointed large sedan. But Reddit user siliconclassics talked about a bad experience. “A year ago I bought a 5-speed 1999 Volvo S70 from the stereotypical shady Craigslist seller – young-ish Russian used car sales dude selling it for someone else in Brooklyn, had it warmed up and ready both times I came to look at it. It had a clean history and complete service records from the original owner, and it seemed ok, so I bought it.

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“A few weeks later I’m driving it and notice the engine sounds louder than normal. Eventually, I get around to checking the oil and the dipstick is completely dry (the level was fine when I bought it). Turns out it burns a quart every 300 miles and by the time I discovered this it was 3 quarts low. But after topping up the oil it ran ok. Around the same time, I discovered that the clutch has a problem when cold – it doesn’t fully disengage, making it impossible to shift into gear from a standstill. The solution is to start the engine with the trans in gear and avoid stopping in neutral until it’s warmed up for 10 or 15 minutes.”

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