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25 GM Cars From The ’90s Everyone Forgot (And Who Could Blame Them)

Cameron EittreimAugust 30, 2021

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14: Pontiac Trans Sport

As with most of the rebadging that GM did during the 1990s, the Trans Sport was another indication of that process. This time instead of a dustbuster-themed van, you had a sport-themed van. The styling of the Trans Sport was horrible to look at and the second generation of the van got one of the worst crash test ratings in history (via Motor Trend).

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Sadly, GM tried to rebrand this van as Montana later on, but even that wasn’t enough to bolster the sales of the car. It would appear that most people just aren’t willing to pay a premium for something that lacks both style and substance.

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13: Chevrolet Blazer

The Blazer went from being a top competitor in the SUV market to something questionable at best. The Blazer was designed to appeal to a mainstream audience and compete with the Ford Explorer. But unlike the Explorer, the Blazer didn’t have a V8 engine or the same versatility (via Motor Trend).

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In later years the Blazer was gifted some modern luxury options such as OnStar and a refresh in 1998, but that wasn’t enough to keep it viable. Chevy replaced the Blazer with the TrailBlazer SUV and most consumers have moved on from the ancient model.

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12: Geo Storm

GM wanted to come out swinging with the Geo brand. The Storm was one of the first models. The Geo Storm was based on the Isuzu Impulse, which was also sold as a compact car in the United States. What separated the Storm from the Impulse wasn’t much more than the front fascia, but the vast amount of Chevrolet dealers helped this car to sell quite well (via Edmunds).

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Still, the Storm wasn’t the most reliable compact car on the market and the performance was lackluster altogether. The Storm amassed a loyal following of owners who still drive and collect the car to this day, but for the most part, people have forgotten the car.

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11: GM EV1

The first mass-produced electric car was the EV1 and it managed to become quite the cultural phenomenon in a short amount of time. But the EV1 suffered an unfortunate fate at the hands of GM executives who were more interested in gas-guzzling SUV models. Nowadays, Tesla rules the roost when it comes to electric cars but the EV1 was one of the first (via The Smithsonian).

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Surprisingly enough, there are still some surviving EV1 models on the road today, although the vast majority of these cars were destroyed. Looking back at the ’90s, it was a time for innovation in the automotive industry. But the EV1 is a sad example of what went wrong.

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10: Lumina AVP

Along with the other ugly-looking minivan offerings from GM in the 1990s, the Lumina AVP was the Chevy offering. Having the same plastic body panels and dustbuster shape the Lumina AVP was not the looker many had hoped for (via The Sun-Sentinel). The Lumina AVP went through several trim styles during its relatively short lifecycle including a redesign in 1995.

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Sadly, the dustbuster style of the Lumina and the GM vans, in general, was not enough to resonate with consumers. For the most part, consumers have generally forgotten the GM dustbuster vans of the 1990s due to their hideous styling.

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9: Oldsmobile Achieva

Oldsmobile was a shell of its former self by the 1990s and the brand was littered with recycled GM vehicles. The Achieva was a small sedan that had skirts over the rear wheels and looked generally dated. The powerplant was shared with other sedans from the GM lineup as well so there wasn’t anything special.

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The Achieva was sold in a four-door and two-door combination although most of us have forgotten this car existed. The typical GM quality issues were present on the Achieva which deterred a lot of buyers from GM cars around this period.

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8: Pontiac LeMans

If there was ever a company that could completely tarnish a classic and well-known automotive nameplate, it’s GM. From 1988 to 1993 the company sold a rebadged Daewoo (via The Truth About Cars) as the LeMans and the car was downright horrible. Consumers noted a complete lack of power in the car as well as lacking most luxuries that were available on other cars from the period.

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It didn’t help things out that the LeMans were downright minuscule on American roads. The 0-60 times were abysmally slow, and if you had to merge onto the freeway you’d be better off riding a bike. There are a few of these cars that have managed to survive although most car enthusiasts have forgotten them.

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7: Chevrolet Malibu

Another questionable car of the ’90s was the Malibu. The car has become synonymous with your local Enterprise car rental service and that was about it. The styling was about as bland as you could get, even when compared to a Camry. The interior was equally bland although some luxury features were available.

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The V6 engine was notoriously difficult to repair. There was a DexCool Recall (via Repair Pal) that affected these cars as well. With a pretty much invisible resale value, you’ll seldom see one of these on the road as most of them have been junked.

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6: Oldsmobile Cutlass

As if the Malibu wasn’t bad enough, GM decided to temporarily offer the car like the Oldsmobile Cutlass as well. This isn’t the same Cutlass that you remember going to prom night in. Instead, it was a bland sedan. The only differences from the Malibu were the exterior colors and the front fascia of the vehicle.

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Aside from that, the Cutlass from this period didn’t offer anything special (via Repair Pal) or anything that even remotely resembled the original car. The now-bland Cutlass was a sad example of how GM was putting passenger cars on the backburner during this period.

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5: Cadillac Catera

Talk about an awful experiment. As if Cadillac didn’t learn from the Cimmaron of the 1980s, they tried again with the Catera. The Catera was marketed toward young professionals who would be interested in a compact European car. Sadly, the Catera was a far cry from anything that you’d consider “European” or luxurious.

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The styling was downright awful and the car performed about as well as you’d expect considering the looks. The Catera was also woefully unreliable (via Car and Driver) and coupled with the high cost of repairs it just didn’t fit the bill that many consumers were looking for.

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4: Cadillac Escalade

The first-generation Escalade was about as bland of an attempt at a luxury SUV as you could get. GM took the run-of-the-mill Tahoe (via Kelly Blue Book) that we were all familiar with and slapped some different fenders on it. There was nothing remotely unique about the original Escalade but the price was a whole lot more expensive.

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Nowadays there are quite a few issues that tend to plague these vehicles, and most consumers flock toward the second-generation models that debuted in 2002. Still, the Escalade was an eye-opening SUV that went on to influence pop culture in a major way.

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3: Chevrolet Astro

GM just couldn’t seem to get the formula for a minivan just right. So the Astro was sold alongside the dustbuster vans as well as the Venture. The Astro wasn’t a bad van necessarily, but it also wasn’t something that you can see yourself driving for decades. Most consumers remember growing up with the Astro and experiencing the rough ride (via Nada Guides).

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Talk about gas-guzzling. The Astro about the furthest thing that you could get from a gas-efficient minivan model. Later models had some unique features like AWD and a more luxurious interior but it just wasn’t enough to sell this big box on wheels.

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2: Buick Roadmaster Wagon

The Roadmaster was sort of a confusing car by the ’90s because consumers had moved on from station wagons as family transportation. The styling was about as bland as you could get and the ride was well-cushioned. The unique thing about the Roadmaster was the powerful Corvette-based (via Bloomberg) engine that was under the hood.

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But this station wagon was huge. You’d have to see one in person to appreciate just how big it is. The Roadmaster wagon was an influential car in a lot of ways at the time it was released. But nowadays no one except for enthusiasts remember this car.

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1: Isuzu Hombre

GM continued to rebadge Isuzu cars well into the 1990s. In exchange for that, they offered the Japanese automaker an S10 to sell. The Hombre was about as barebones as you could get from the trim packages to its advertising. It did have a slightly more handsome face than the S10 but that wasn’t enough to justify the truck (via The Truth About Cars).

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You’d have to be a very dedicated GM enthusiast to even remember this truck as there are very few of them that are still on the road today. Nevertheless, the Hombre was not the last pickup truck that was shared by GM and Isuzu as the Colorado/Canyon came a few years later.

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