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20 Reasons Electric Cars Aren’t Taking Over Just Yet

Cameron EittreimMay 21, 2021

The electric car revolution is in full swing, and these vehicles are now more mainstream than ever. However, there are still drawbacks to owning an electric car which is why the market is still developing. For gas-powered vehicles to be fully replaced, an electric car will need to function in almost all the same ways.

In addition, an electric car needs to have an affordable entry-level option. The marketplace for electric cars is quite expensive, and repairs can be quite costly as well. Let’s break down 20 reasons that electric cars aren’t going to become the norm just yet via Goliath.

Photo Credit: Push EVS

20: Expensive Battery Replacements

The first and most obvious issue with owning an electric car is the cost of a battery replacement. The average American family doesn’t even have $500 in savings for an emergency, much less the cost of thousands a battery replacement can cost. This replacement can be a detailed repair job that the average mechanic won’t be able to do.

Photo Credit: Push EVS

Until the cost of a replacement battery comes down in price an electric car just won’t be a feasible option for the average consumer. Many families need an affordable option and that means repairs that are reasonable to afford.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

19: Charging Stations

Electric cars are becoming close to a norm, and with that said there are more and more charging stations. But if you live in rural America you probably won’t see a charging station for miles on end. For someone who lives in that part of the country, an electric car just isn’t a practical option yet. It can be miles between the nearest town and not being able to charge your vehicle just isn’t an option.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Likewise, the lack of charging stations might make it difficult for electric pickup trucks to find a niche in the market as well. Unless the ability to recharge is within reach, most consumers are just going to go for the traditional method of transportation.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

18: Their Heavy Weight

Believe it or not, an electric car is heavier than a gas-powered car. This is because an electric car uses a massive battery to power it. Sometimes these batteries can weigh thousands of pounds, which adds to the weight of the vehicle. While you might think you’re driving a lightweight car, in reality, you aren’t. Of course, there are exceptions to this like the Tesla Roadster, which was amazingly agile for its size.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Then you have the Tesla Cybertruck, a beast of a metal creation. Most drivers just can’t fathom driving something so heavy if it’s not a heavy-duty pickup truck or something of substance. That Model S is often too much of a heavyweight for the average consumer to consider.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

17: Inability To Repair

Unless you have an advanced engineering degree, you aren’t going to be working on an electric car. For most consumers, this is a major problem. Having the freedom to work on their vehicles has inspired thousands of people. Not to mention the fact that fixing your owncar is financially sound. But, when it comes to repairing an electric vehicle, you aren’t going to be able to do this in your garage.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Until electric cars can be repaired by the owner, there’s going to be a small portion of the market that turns their nose up. Sadly, based on the kind of technology that goes into these cars, there’s probably never going to be a time to fix them on your own.

Photo Credit: Tesla

16: The Range Isn’t There

For most families, hopping in the car and hitting the road is a fun thing to do. Unfortunately, in an electric car, you are limited to the range that it can go. You have to plan your trip out ahead of time and find charging stations for your car. Many electric car drivers fear not being able to find a charging station and getting stuck somewhere along the trip.

Photo Credit: Tesla

Most electric cars have a range of about 258 miles, but this is not enough for a full-featured cross-country trip. So drivers tend to still go for gasoline-powered cars because you can always find a fueling station.

Photo Credit: Nissan

15: Slow Charging Times

Just because you are going to find a charging station doesn’t mean you’ll be done in time. The typical charging time for an electric car is around eight hours. New technology has been advancing the charging time, but that doesn’t cover the thousands of used electric cars on the road. Most common car buyers can’t afford a brand-new electric car, and thus the vast majority of consumers will go used.

Photo Credit: Nissan

Until the charging times and battery technology advance, most consumers will avoid electric cars altogether. For most consumers, we need to go right now, and can’t wait around for the charging to be complete.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

14: High Price Tag

Electric cars cost a lot more upfront than most gasoline-powered vehicles. This source of sticker shock is a piece of contention for most consumers. Although there’s a tax break of $7,500 for new vehicle purchases, it just doesn’t matter to most people. That high price tag makes the electric car almost in the same league as a luxury car. When you just want affordable transportation, you aren’t trying to spend the price of a Lexus.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

There have been attempts to build an entry-level electric car, such as the Nissan Leaf for instance. However, the car was so scaled down that most consumers didn’t go for it.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

13: Batteries Will Wear Out

Because electric cars are still fairly new to the mainstream, the timeframe for battery degradation is still a mystery. An average gasoline engine has a lifespan of 140,000 miles, whereas an electric battery is iffy. Until the reliability of these batteries is figured out most consumers will steer clear of electric vehicles. While some aspects of the vehicle are more reliable other aspects just bring up questions.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The reliability of a vehicle is one of the most important aspects of the purchase. If you have no idea as to how reliable the car is going to be, you probably won’t make the purchase. Electric vehicles are still a new thing and there hasn’t been much proven about them when it comes to reliability.

Photo Credit: KTVU

12: Fire Hazard

There have long been reports of electric cars catching on fire, and it’s always in the back of people’s minds. Because an electric car is completely electric, the risk of fire is a lot higher than your average gas-powered vehicle. Likewise, there are also fears about how an electric car would fare in an accident without catching fire.

Photo Credit: KTVU

These are just some of the things that prevent people from purchasing electric vehicles. Because these cars are still fairly new on the market the worries that accompany them are valid. Consumers should also take the time to check the vehicle’s track record thus far.

Photo Credit: Toyota

11: Subpar Performance

Before the current crop of electric cars from Tesla and Ford, performance and electricity weren’t equated in the same sentence. The thing that made most electric cars stand out was the fact that they were painfully slow. Take the GM EV1 or the early Toyota Rav4 EV, both of which were not comparable to a gasoline-powered engine. Performance-wise, most electric cars are quite fast nowadays.

Photo Credit: GM

But getting drivers to see that is another thing, and electric cars have a long road ahead of them to replace gasoline-powered vehicles. Drivers need to understand that an electric car can compete in every sense of the word.

Photo Credit: Fisker

10: Lack of Availability

Electric cars are still a brand new concept when you put into perspective the age. This means that finding an electric car is not easy for a vast majority of the country. Tesla for instance only has dealerships in the large metropolitan cities. And car companies like Nissan and Ford are only ordering these cars in small numbers. Quite a few electric cars such as the Fisker Karma were in a special order, which made it even harder to acquire.

Photo Credit: Rivian

The Rivian Truck is another prime example of an electric car that might be hard to get. Until dealerships, in the middle of the country start carrying these cars, it might be a tough sell. At the moment, an electric car is more of a luxury item than a mainstream vehicle.

Photo Credit: Tesla

9: Lack of Service Centers

An electric car is not an average vehicle, which means that finding a place to service it isn’t easy. Most run-of-the-mill automotive mechanics that you are going to come across are not equipped to work on one of these vehicles. Finding a suitable service center for your electric vehicle is few and far between, and quite costly to boot. Most vehicle owners look for a mechanic who is trustworthy and gets the job done.

Photo Credit: Tesla

But this is a bit harder with an electric car because most mechanics are not familiar with these vehicles just yet. You’ll be in for a bit of sticker shock if you do manage to find a mechanic who can do the job right the first time.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

8: Lack of Charging Infrastructure

It’s not just the fact that there aren’t a lot of charging stations, it’s also the fact that most power grids are not equipped to handle millions of charging vehicles. The whole concept of electric vehicles was only mainstream in the last decade. As such, most of the power companies in the country have not been able to upgrade.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Likewise, most new homes are not built with a dedicated charging station either, which means you need to outfit a spot to charge your car. This is next to impossible if you live in an apartment complex or a condominium. If the charging infrastructure is upgraded in the next couple of years more people will be accepting electric vehicles.

Photo Credit: Pexel

7: High Electric Bill

Upfront, owning an electric vehicle might seem cheaper than paying for gasoline. But when you are charging the vehicle in your home, you are going to pay a higher bill. This is something that scares a lot of potential electric car drivers. Many of whom are already dealing with higher energy costs across the board. Again, electric cars are such a new concept that most people haven’t factored in what it would cost to own one.

Photo Credit: Pexel

Until homes are built to handle these types of vehicles owning one might be a difficult proposition. If you live in a large city, you can park at a public charging station when you are at work. That will eliminate the need to charge at your home for the most part, which is a good thing.

Photo Credit: Tesla

6: Limited Cargo Capacity

Another problem in the earliest days of electric cars was the limited cargo capacity. Because of the massive size of the battery, it can take up a good deal of the trunk or engine bay. There is the advantage of no moving parts in the engine but it still takes up a lot of space. In the Tesla Model 3, this isn’t a problem because it is a crossover style vehicle but in a sedan or coupe could be a problem.

Photo Credit: Tesla

The Tesla Roadster for instance had a limited amount of cargo space, which made a lot of buyers turn the other way. Again, the electric car makers are working to change this but a lot of shoppers still need to be convinced.

Photo Credit: GM

5: Electric Car Cost

Let’s face the facts, right now electric cars are expensive to buy. The new Hummer EV is going to be upwards of $70,000. This means that the average pickup truck buyer is probably going to look toward Nissan or Toyota. As long as electric cars are priced so high it is going to limit the marketing potential of these vehicles. The high price of the vehicle is to compensate for the cost of the battery and design.

Photo Credit: GM

But still, if you are marketing to a certain class it can be hard to justify the price. And right now electric cars cost a pretty penny to own. There are tax incentives but that just isn’t enough to justify the high price for an electric car right now.

Photo Credit: Nissan

4: Zero Emissions As A Lie

While an electric car itself doesn’t burn fuel or put emissions into the atmosphere, the power for the vehicle has to come from somewhere. The majority of power is still coming from a coal-powered plant somewhere. So when they say an electric car is zero emissions that isn’t always the case. You are still going to contribute to ozone depletion, just not upfront like you would with a gas vehicle.

Photo Credit: Nissan

For a lot of buyers, the fact that these vehicles are still polluting in one way or another makes the appeal limiting. Coupled with the high price tag you just have a recipe for disaster that is going to cost an arm and a leg.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

3: Quick Charging Can Damage Batteries

A new thing that has been popping up in big cities across the country is rapid charging stations. Sometimes these rapid charging stations can get a vehicle fully charged in under thirty minutes. But there is a problem with that and it comes to the battery. When you rapidly charge something you will degrade the battery a lot sooner. Because these batteries cost thousands of dollars, most consumers are not willing to take that risk.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Maintenance on an electric car can cost a lot of money, and having a battery go out is just not something that most people want to deal with. Quick charging might be convenient, but it’s not something drivers want to do every time.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

2: Resale Value Is Questionable

It seems like electric cars are changing every month with a new feature or design. This means the used market is going to be saturated. On top of the fact that these cars are extremely expensive to repair, you also have a flood of models. Older models like the Chevy Volt or the Nissan Leaf have fallen out of favor. With unstable resale values, the electric car just doesn’t make a well-used car option.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

This will change in the future as more electric cars make their way onto the market. Places like California are making it to where the electric car will be the only new car sold on the market at one point.

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1: Parts Are Hard To Find

Electric cars are still new, and finding parts can be next to impossible. If you have a 1996 Toyota Corolla, you can find everything online from engine replacement parts to body panels. If you have a Tesla Roadster, this is not as easy of a task, and that scares most consumers away. Electric cars are not mainstream enough for the average consumer to be able to repair and own.

Photo Credit: Nissan

Until this changes, you won’t see a good number of the vehicles on the road being electric. It just won’t make sense for the consumers who enjoy being do-it-yourselfers. If you can’t even find a replacement fender, it will be costly to own an electric car.

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