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Cars From The Last 20 Years That Should Be Wiped From Auto History

Cameron EittreimJune 15, 2022

The automotive industry is a quickly changing place where manufacturers are always trying to hit the next big thing. Whether it was the retro car fad of the early 2000s or the current revitalization of the muscle car era, there is always something new going on in the car world. But there are many models that have failed to gain any traction or earn a place in auto history.

Some models just don’t hit home with drivers and end up being relegated to the rental fleets and used car lots as auto history doesn’t remember them fondly. We looked back at vehicles from the last 20 years that should be wiped from history. These were cars and trucks that hit the market and didn’t make sense to anyone.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

51: 2020 Land Rover Defender 110

The Defender 110 was all over the automotive press when it was announced because Land Rover was bringing the model back to the U.S. There was a lot to like about the Defender, but there have also been many issues. Most modern Land Rover models aren’t reliable and repairs can be expensive (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Defender 110 looked to build on the popularity of open-air SUV models. The high-end design and features cater to a certain clientele. It will be interesting to see if Land Rover can overcome the reliability issues that have plagued the brand for some time.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

50: 2019 Hyundai Kona

Another questionable crossover was the Hyundai Kona. It’s been panned for lackluster styling and its performance is also questionable. The refinement of the Kona is also not what you’d expect from a modern Hyundai. The interior is cramped, and reliability has been questionable (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Time will tell how the Kona will do in the long run, but the lack of refinement is a sore spot for consumers. Hyundai has released several of these compact crossovers in hopes of drumming up sales.

Nissan Kicks
Photo Credi: Nissan

49: 2018 Nissan Kicks

The Nissan brand was going through a transition phase in the late 2000s. The Nissan Kicks was a new compact crossover unique to the market. The problem with the Nissan Kicks is that it was lacking in standard equipment. Another problem consumers had with the kicks is that the CVT transmission is problematic (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Nissan Kicks will continue to be sold, but it hasn’t been the success Nissan had hoped for. These crossover SUVs are pretty much all the same when it comes to styling and lack of refinement.

Fiat 124 Spider
Photo Credit: Fiat

48: 2017 FIAT 124 Spider

The return of the Fiat brand to the U.S. market was highly publicized and the Spider was one of the most anticipated cars. Competing directly with the likes of the Mazda MX-5, the Fiat 124 Spider had a lot of potential. Unfortunately, there were a lot of quality issues early on that prevented the car from being a success (via Car Talk).

Fiat 124
Photo Credit: Fiat

The reliability of the roadster was questionable at best. There have been several popular roadsters in the past couple of decades, but the Fiat 124 Spider fell flat in almost every area.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

47: 2016 Nissan Quest

The final year for the Quest was as unassuming as the previous generations. This time, the van had a distinct box shape and Nissan didn’t even advertise it. The boxy Quest was based on the Nissan Forum concept. But the styling didn’t resonate with consumers and minivan sales were already slipping (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Nissan would quietly exit the minivan segment after this model, although the Quest was never a strong seller. The minivan segment had become crowded, and Chrysler still dominated it all these years.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

46: 2015 Chevrolet SS

GM tends to drop the ball and that was the case with the Chevrolet SS. The sedan was based on the outgoing Pontiac G8 platform and its exterior styling was bland. Considering how much horsepower was under the hood, the SS didn’t look the part at all (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

It also didn’t help things out that GM rarely advertised the vehicle, so most consumers didn’t even know that it was on the market. The SS was more of a halo car than anything, and the model was phased out within a few years.

Photo Credit: Toyota

45: 2014 Toyota Prius V

By 2014, the Prius was becoming dated. Also, gas prices were going down, so the car wasn’t as popular as it was a few years prior. The Prius V was designed to attract buyers who want more cargo space and versatility. From the outward appearance, the car was pretty much the same as previous models (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Toyota

This is where consumers got a bit confused, as the car wasn’t much different at all. Toyota tried to market the Prius as a hip new vehicle, but it wasn’t original at all. Much of the design remained the same, and the Prius V failed to garner any real interest.

Photo Credit: Chrysler

44: 2013 Dodge Dart

Another car critics panned was the 2013 Dart. Chrysler said the car was part of a billion-dollar investment. The problem was that the car was too small and lacked many standard features. The Dart was marketed as a performance car but was far from it (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Chrysler

The chief complaint among many was the CVT transmission. Many automakers have turned to CVT transmissions, and they are not the best. The Dart would go on for a few years before being discontinued.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

43: 2012 Honda Civic

The 2012 Honda Civic was one of the biggest blunders Honda has made in the last few decades. Critics panned the car for being too small and lacking the quality consumers have come to expect. This prompted Honda to do an emergency redesign the next year (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

There has never been a mess like this at Honda before, and the negative reaction to the Civic was not a good one. The 2012 Civic could have been designed correctly from the gate, but Honda rushed the design into production.

Photo Credit: Honda

42: 2011 Honda Insight

The Insight was back for 2011 and this time it was a bonafide Prius clone. There was nothing original about it. Even the car’s shape resembled the Prius down to the C-pillars. The Insight was not a sales success for Honda this time around, as it didn’t offer anything unique (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Honda

While there were buyers who wanted a dedicated hybrid, the Insight wasn’t it. At this point, the Prius had a stronghold on the market. The Insight would trudge on for a few years until Honda decided to discontinue it only to redesign it again.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

41: 2010 Suzuki Equator

The Equator was another strange vehicle released in the mid-2000s. Right at the end of Suzuki’s popularity in America, the company released a rebadged Nissan Frontier. But that still wasn’t enough to propel the truck to sales success (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Suzuki

The Equator fell short in many key areas. Suzuki thought the truck would appeal to motorsports customers who were purchasing a Suzuki motorcycle or ATV. That was not the case, although a few of them did manage to sell, and you will see them from time to time.

Photo Credit: Hyundai

40: 2009 Hyundai Veracruz

2009 marked a time when Hyundai was back at it with a new SUV. The Veracruz was one of the first crossover SUVs on the market and it had seven-passenger seating. It was set to compete with the new GM models. Although the Veracruz had promising preorders, initial sales fell short (via Car Talk).

Photo Credit: Hyundai

One reason for the bad sales numbers was undoubtedly the economic recession at the time. But there were other issues consumers with the Veracruz, such as the build quality and price. The Veracruz was discontinued shortly thereafter and the model has not been revisited.

Photo Credit: Hyundai

39: 2008 Hyundai Entourage

In 2008, Hyundai again tried to tackle a new market segment, this time the minivan. The Entourage shared its platform and body with the new Kia Sedona. While the van was a huge improvement, it still couldn’t compete with Chrysler. Chrysler had perfected the minivan for decades while others failed (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Hyundai

The Entourage fell short in many key areas, and the van just didn’t have the name brand recognition. Not to mention the fact that the minivan market was heavily flooded at this time, and it was hard for a new van to make a name for itself.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

38: 2007 Hyundai Azera

By 2007, the Hyundai lineup was vastly different from years prior and the automaker continued to improve on quality. That next step in its evolution was the Azera, and the car was better in almost every way. But once again, Hyundai was trying too hard to sell a premium product far too soon (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Its price was high and consumers couldn’t comprehend buying a luxury car from a Hyundai dealership. The Azera experiment didn’t last long and the car was replaced in favor of a few models that we still have today.

Photo Credit: GM

37: 2006 Isuzu Ascender

In 2006, Isuza was pushing rebadged GM models that had already been on the market since 2002. In this case, it was the poorly disguised Ascender. If you mistook this SUV for a GMC Envoy, don’t be surprised, because everything is the same other than a few badges (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: GM

The Ascender was one of the last new models to sport an Isuzu badge. Sales were so minimal that you’ll seldom see one on the road. Toward the end, these were heavily discounted and were a good deal if you wanted an Envoy for half the price.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

36: 2005 Hyundai Tucson

Hyundai was relatively late to the compact SUV segment. The Tucson was the first compact Hyundai SUV. From the outside, it looked like a baby version of the Santa Fe. But the Tucson had a lot of reliability issues from the gate, and this wasn’t a good look for Hyundai (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Tucson had a lot of potential and was initially popular because of its great warranty and cheap price tag. But once consumers took the SUV home, they could tell it needed a lot more refinement. The original Tucson is an SUV that should be wiped from history.

2008-pontiac-grand-prix-photo-199089-s-original
Photo Credit: GM

35: 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix

The redesigned Grand Prix was a completely new look for the brand. The sedan had new sheet metal and a higher performance demeanor. Under the hood, things were largely unchanged, however. The Grand Prix was still an underwhelming family sedan offering compared to the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry (via Forbes).

2004 Pontiac Grand Prix - 2005 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP Sedan
Photo Credit: Edmunds

Although Pontiac tried to market the car as exciting, it was anything but that. There was a special edition of the Grand Prix with a Northstar V8, but this body style saw a fairly limited release. Overall, this Grand Prix was one of the most disappointing options to come from GM in a long time.

Photo Credits: GM

34: 2004 Pontiac GTO

When the Pontiac GTO nameplate was revived in 2004, the automotive community went wild. The prospect of the legendary GTO returning was appealing. But then consumers got to see what the car looked like and the excitement was gone. The new GTO was nothing more than a rebadged Holden model (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

If that wasn’t bad enough, the styling was nothing like you’d expect on a GTO. The car was a far cry from the previous models. It didn’t help things that Ford was gearing up to release a retro-inspired Mustang model. Everything the GTO should have done, Ford did with the Mustang.

Photo Credit: Ford

33: 2004 Mercury Monterey

Toward the mid-2000s, the Mercury brand was a mere shadow of its former self, selling nothing but re-branded Fords. The Monterey is a case in point here, as it was nothing more than a refreshed Ford Freestar (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

There were some luxury features inside, but that was it. The exterior was largely the same, and the brand charged a premium price tag for it. When it came to the Mercury vehicles of this period, there was nothing unique about them.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

32: 2004 Cadillac SRX

After seeing the initial sales success of the Nissan Murano, GM decided to release a Cadillac crossover model. The SRX was also ahead of its time when it came to the crossover SUV, but the design was not of the highest quality. Because it was based on the CTS, reliability was questionable at best (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Surprisingly the SRX was a surprise hit for the brand and sales were excellent. But the reliability was a drawback and most consumers were frustrated. The SRX has managed to live on in the lineup to this day, albeit with a new design.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

31: 2004 Nissan Quest

Nissan stayed in the minivan segment until recently. The Quest that came along in 2004 was a complete redesign, but the problem is that some would consider it too extreme. Nissan went for a dramatic styling on the Quest unlike other minivans on the market (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

When you think of a minivan, you don’t think of radical styling. The Quest was never a big seller for the company. As time went on, new offerings overshadowed the van from Chrysler and even the other updated Japanese competitors.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

30: 2004 Saturn Vue Redline

Saturn released the 2004 Vue Redline in an attempt to inject life into a dying automotive brand. The Redline wasn’t much of an improvement over the standard Saturn Vue, which meant the Redline badge didn’t mean anything. Sure, there was a ground effects kit, but the basic styling of the Vue was ugly (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

General Motors was attempting to reinvigorate life into the Saturn brand, but it wasn’t able to. The Vue Redline was just another failed model. Saturn would be one of the first brands to get the ax when GM filed for bankruptcy.

Photo Credit: Land Rover

29: 2003 Land Rover Freelander

The Freelander was a unique proposition for Land Rover because it was an entry-level compact SUV. You could say the Freelander was one of the first compact luxury SUVs. The problem was that its reliability was at best questionable. The Freelander didn’t do anything right and its price was too high (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Land Rover

Although sales of the Freelander were initially good, they tapered off fairly quickly. Nowadays, buying a used Freelander is a risky proposition as you never know how reliable it will be. The Freelander was, for the most part. a failure for the brand.

Photo Credit: Isuzu

28: 2003 Isuzu Axiom

At this point, the Isuzu brand was all but forgotten in the U.S. The SUV segment had become so saturated that there was no room for an outdated Isuzu. Even though the exterior was fairly modern, the reality was that the Axiom just didn’t provide anything unique (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The platform was based on the Isuzu Rodeo, and this time vastly outdated. The reliability of the Axiom was also questionable, and the Isuzu dealership network was shrinking. What the company needed was a brand-new SUV design, but that never happened. Isuzu left the U.S. market around 2008.

Hyundai Tiburon
Photo Credit: Hyundai

27: 2003 Hyundai Tiburon

The Tiburon was not the most impressive sports car in its first generation. But from a budget standpoint, it was a great car. The 2003 model introduced a turbocharged motor and a new modern design. From the outside, the Tiburon was an attractive-looking sports car (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Hyundai

But its reliability was not the best at the time, and the Tiburon was panned for its cheap build quality. On top of that, the resale value of the car was minuscule at best, which meant you could rarely recoup your investment.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

26: 2003 Nissan Murano

You could say the Murano was one of the first crossover vehicles. The unique look of the car translated to great initial sales. But the performance of the Murano was anything but appealing and the car didn’t sell well. Nissan tried to add to the appeal of the SUV as time went on but it didn’t work (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Reliability issues with the CVT transmission gave the Murano a questionable driving experience. Most consumers who were in the running to buy one of these quickly gave up on it. The Murano is still in the Nissan lineup with a unique look, but the original model was quite a mess.

Photo Credit: GM

25: 2003 Saturn ION

The Ion was the first new compact Saturn to have a completely new design. For 2003, it was shared with other vehicles in the GM portfolio. The ION was not an original car the first Saturn models had been, and this was a disappointment for some loyalists. The ION was also lethargic when it came to the performance (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The interior was cheaply made, and none of the unique safety features were present in the car. As time went on, GM would try to refresh the ION, but it wasn’t enough. The car couldn’t get over the hurdles of the lackluster design.

Photo Credit: Chrysler

24: 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser

The PT Cruiser was a massive hit for Chrysler when it first hit the market as all retro-themed cars were at that time. But when it got down to the nitty-gritty, the PT Cruiser was not the most appealing car on the road. The mechanics of the PT were cheap at best, and the design of the car was outdated, to say the least (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Chrysler

The interesting thing about the PT Cruiser is that the car sold well. But as time went on, consumers were leery of the product, and Chrysler eventually discontinued it. There were some interesting models, such as the GT and the convertible.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

23: 2003 Lincoln LS

The Lincoln LS took almost all its mechanicals from the Jaguar X-Type. Everything down to the power plant was designed by Jaguar, and that was not a good thing. Jaguar reliability at the time was lackluster at best and the LS was critically panned (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

While it did have V8 power, it didn’t utilize it well. The performance of the LS and lack of reliability just didn’t justify the high price tag. There are few cars worth forgetting as much as the Lincoln LS.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

22: 2003 Kia Rio Cinco

By the mid-2000s, Kia had built up a decent reputation with consumers. It was a cheap car brand but offered decent value for the price. The Rio Cinco was an attempt to attract young buyers who wanted a station wagon. Sadly, the Rio Cinco was cramped in the interior and didn’t offer a lot of value (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

Its performance was lethargic at best. The Rio Cinco would be sold for a couple of years until the car was redesigned. There weren’t many sold and you’ll seldom see them on the road anymore.

Sport Trac
Photo Credit: Ford

21: 2003 Ford Explorer Sport Trac

The problem with the Sport Trac was that it was the prior generation Explorer. But Explorer moved on to a new generation the same year. So consumers who wanted the truck bed option were forced to get an outdated model (via Forbes).

Sport Trac
Photo Credit: Ford

The Explorer Sport Trac did have some nice attributes, but it wasn’t enough to keep it on the market. Sales were lackluster and Ford eventually pulled it from the market. Years later, the brand was revisited for a short period but Ford again killed it off.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

20: 2002 Mitsubishi Diamante

The Diamante was another letdown for the automaker that never resonated with consumers. It was a big sedan but the ride quality was lacking, and when it came to performance, it wasn’t there (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Diamante didn’t have much going for it. The price was high and the features were limited. There were much better options on the market at the time and the Diamante didn’t have a place to fit in.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

19: 2002 Hyundai XG350

The Hyundai XG350 was a groundbreaking car for the company. It was the first luxury car Hyundai attempted to sell in the U.S. Before the XG, the brand had never been even close to being called a luxury car maker. The XG350 had some nice touches, but the car was nothing more than a Lexus clone (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

The problem with being a Lexus clone is that the build quality wasn’t as good. Reliability was shoddy at best. The XG350 was never a success for the Hyundai brand, and nowadays the car isn’t even recognizable.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

18: 2002 Volvo V40

The Volvo V4 was an attempt to create a smaller and sportier wagon model. The problem is that most people didn’t want a station wagon, no matter how hard Volvo tried to market it. So the V40 never sold well. There were also many issues related to the reliability of the wagon (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

The V40 couldn’t compete with the larger Volvo wagon. The result was a car that never lived up to the hype. The V40 was discontinued a few years after it was released after never quite catching on with consumers.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

17: 2002 Mitsubishi Galant

The Galant was the mainstay family sedan in the Mitsubishi lineup for many years. From the outside looking in, the sedan was boring. There wasn’t much to like about the exterior styling and performance was mediocre at best (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Toyota Camry and Honda Accord from this generation were much better cars. Their exterior designs were better. As time went on, Mitsubishi continued to improve the look and feel of the car, but it never did bolster sales.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

16: 2002 Saab 9-5

The Saab 9-5 is one of the most controversial cars of the 2000s. The car hit the market at a time when GM purchased the Saab brand. What used to be excellent engineering and driving characteristics was anything but that. The 9-5 just didn’t live up to the hype and its reliability was downright horrible (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Even today, the car is often billed as an unreliable ride, and not one that you want to purchase used. The Saab brand went dramatically downhill in terms of quality after the GM purchase, and it never did recover. There were much better options if you wanted a Swedish ride, and the demise of Saab was a sad one.

Photo Credit: Ford

15: 2002 Ford ZX2

The Escort was always an integral part of the Ford lineup. But by the 2000s, the market for compact cars was quite crowded. The ZX2 had a barebones design with cheap interior materials and lackluster build quality. This was not a sports car in any sense even though Ford tried to bill it as excitement (via Forbes).

Ford Escort ZX2
Photo Credit: Car Domain

The ZX2 would trudge on for a few more years, but this is one Ford that should be wiped from history. The car made no sense, and there wasn’t enough there to justify even purchasing one of these.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

14: 2002 Volkswagen Cabrio

The Cabrio was one of the last convertible models sold by Volkswagen. The car had a lot of potential but the reliability was lacking. The design of the car was also quite dated when you compared it to other models on the road. The Cabrio was meant to be a fun-to-drive car but it was anything but that (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

For years, the Cabrio was sold as part of the Volkswagen lineup, but by the 2000s it was time for a change. Volkswagen switched things up, and the Cabrio was removed from the lineup shortly thereafter.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

13: 2002 Suzuki Aerio

The Aerio was a notable subcompact released by Suzuki. It had a lot of potential because it was modern and offered a fair amount of standard features. But the cheap design wasn’t compelling enough to sell the car and sales were low (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Aerio got a nice refresh in 2005 but it still wasn’t enough to boost sales. The Aerio was unreliable, and many consumers were upset with the cheap build quality. There were some decent attributes about the Aerio, but it wasn’t the right car for drivers in the end.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

12: 2001 Mitsubishi Mirage

The Mirage was one of the most paltry compact cars ever sold. The 2001 model was extremely stripped-down, especially compared to other models on the market. The Mirage was unlike the rest of the Mitsubishi lineup, including the popular Lancer (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

Calling it a basic car is an understatement overall. It had a cheap plastic interior and lack of options, and the car was extremely unsafe. Mitsubishi is known for its performance, but the Mirage was far from anything exciting.

Hyundai Santa Fe via Hyundai
Photo Credit: Hyundai

11: 2001 Hyundai Santa Fe

The Santa Fe was the first SUV with a Hyundai badge and for the most part, it was well-received. But the build quality of the Santa Fe was far from perfect, and the first models were full of problems. The bright spot was that Hyundai offers one of the best warranties in the automotive business (via Forbes).

2004 Hyundai Santa Fe via Motor Trend
Photo Credit: Hyundai

The Santa Fe was not as off-road capable as many other SUVs from this period. The styling was also debatable, and it could be said Hyundai was aiming for a feminine look. The Santa Fe has managed to stay on the market to this day. Hyundai gradually improved the model as years went on.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

10: 2001 Pontiac Aztek

The Aztek was the first SUV with a Pontiac badge and was heavily marketed by GM. There was product placement in a few well-known TV shows and extensive advertising. The problem with the Aztek is that it was universally panned for excessive body cladding and its performance was lackluster at best (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: GM

The shape of the Aztek was also confusing, although there were many useful outdoor features like a built-in tent. In recent years, the Aztek has gained a cult-like following after it was featured in the hit TV show, “Breaking Bad”.

Photo Credit: Bring A Trailer

9: 2001 Suzuki XL-7

The Suzuki brand was quite limited by 2001. The company wanted to jump onto the SUV craze and decided to launch a stretched version of the Suzuki Vitara SUV. The XL-7 was the first compact SUV with seven-passenger seating and this proved popular (via Forbes).

Suzuki Xl7 #5 | BestCarMagz.net
Photo Credit: Best Car Magz

The XL-7 was a modest success for Suzuki, and there was a version of the model sold until Suzuki exited the American market. The problem is that the XL-7 was nothing more than a stretched Vitara and wasn’t refined. There were much better SUV options on the market at the time.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

8: 2000 Nissan Quest

Nissan tried to jump onto the highly profitable minivan run of the late 1990s. The problem is that no one could approach Chrysler’s dominance during this era. The Quest was a lot smaller in size than Chrysler minivans and its performance was even worse (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

To say the Quest was a crowning achievement for the company would be a lie. Nissan cars from this era were just coming into their own. The company would experience a resurgence a few years later, but it wouldn’t be due to this car. The Quest never stood a chance against the Chrysler minivans.

Photo Credit: Car Gurus

7: 2000 Nissan Sentra

The Sentra has always been a runner-up to the Toyota Corolla and the Honda Civic. It’s not necessarily that the car was bad, but it just wasn’t as good. The 2000 Nissan Sentra was about the most bread-and-butter compact car you could get. Performance was lackluster at best and the interior was cramped (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Car Gurus

The car would get some attitude in a slightly refreshed model a few years later. This generation of the Sentra has mostly been relegated to junkyards at this point. There were better compact cars released in this era. The Sentra wasn’t up to snuff when it came to the compact car segment.

Photo Credit: Jalopnik

6: 2000 Daewoo Nubira

Daewoo is a Korean automaker that had an interesting run in the United States. The automaker had a unique advertising structure here in the U.S. where college students were used to promoting the cars. Although this was a unique strategy, Daewoo sales in the U.S. were minuscule at best (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Jalopnik

The Nubira was a mid-range car that offered decent standard features for the price. But its cheap design and lackluster reliability meant many consumers turned their backs on the car.

Photo Credit: Jalopnik

5: 2000 Daewoo Lanos

The Lanos was the smaller model of the brand and an entry-level offering for new customers. Daewoo was not selling the most advanced or luxurious cars on the road. Around this time, there were quite a few subcompacts on the market and the Lanos didn’t offer anything new (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Jalopnik

The Lanos was also not the most reliable car on the road and word got out quickly. The few consumers who purchased a Daewoo were not impressed with its quality. The brand was in trouble and sales were not going to be improved anytime soon.

Photo Credit: Jalopnik

4: 2000 Kia Spectra

The Kia brand you see today is nothing close to what it was two decades ago. Kia started out in the U.S. market very lean. The Spectra was one of the first new models introduced to the brand after the Sportage and the Sephia. The Spectra offered great gas mileage and a unique design (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Jalopnik

But as with all first model runs, the Spectra had many quality issues from the gate. The car was underpowered and the exterior was not the best looking. The Kia dealership network was also quite small at this time.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

3: 2000 Kia Sportage

Although it’s not the most common car around, the Sportage was one of the first mainstream compact SUVs. But the Toyota RAV4 often overshadowed the Sportage and the Honda CR-V. That’s not to say the Kia Sportage was a bad vehicle, but Kia didn’t have the type of dealership network that big automakers had at the time (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

When it came down to it, the first generation of the Sportage was a very basic vehicle. There was a removable top, and there were some unique attributes to the thing. It just wasn’t enough to propel the Sportage into the same popularity as the other compact SUV models.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

2: 2000 Kia Sephia

By the time 2000 rolled around, the Sephia was tired. It was the first car launched by the Kia Motors Company in the U.S., and that was back in 1994. The car hadn’t changed all that much since then. On top of that, the Sephia was a lot smaller and underpowered than the other compact cars on the market (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

The 2000 Sephia had some of the worst sales in the model’s history and Kia was moving on. The Spectra was the replacement, and the subcompact Rio was also going to hit the market. There was no room for the outdated compact car to be in the lineup and Kia moved on.

Photo Credit: GM

1: 2000 Saturn L-Series

The Saturn brand was a unique offering in the automotive industry when it first hit the market. General Motors invested billions of dollars in the development of the brand and the unique cars sold. The Saturn models were unique to this brand and not shared with any other GM models (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Jalopnik

By the time the L-Series rolled around, the Saturn models were dated. There were better compact offerings that had come to the market. Everything that made the Saturn brand unique at the start was not there anymore. You could say the L-Series spelled the end for Saturn.

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