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Remembering The 25 Worst Chevrolet Cars Ever Made

Cameron EittreimSeptember 13, 2021

Photo Credit: GM

3: Chevy Volt

Elon Musk sprang new life into the electric car segment when Tesla became more successful than any other electric automaker. Naturally, GM was passed up due to incompetence when the company abandoned the EV1. The Volt was an attempt to take Tesla’s market share (via Shift). Sadly, car shoppers didn’t resonate with the bubble-shaped Chevy model. Ultimately, there’s more to an electric car than simply being electric.

Photo Credit: GM

Chevy missed the memo when it came to styling and versatility. The fact that the Volt was partly gas-powered meant you still had to deal with the maintenance issues of gas-powered cars. The Volt was a costly failure for General Motors and the Chevrolet brand. Now, GM is working on new and more advanced electric car technology.

Photo Credit: GM

2: Chevy Silverado Hybrid

The folks at GM needed a way to sell more trucks, but customers were getting frustrated with the gas mileage. The Silverado Hybrid came along to change things up a bit. Unfortunately, the hybrid drivetrain used in the truck didn’t improve the mileage all that much (via (GM Authority). The Silverado Hybrid didn’t get much better gas mileage than the ordinary model. That meant buyers paid a premium for some hybrid badging, and that’s about it.

Photo Credit: GM

The Silverado Hybrid didn’t last long before it was phased out altogether. Consumers were not buying the quickly thrown together hybrid product. The Silverado Hybrid was not the dream truck many environmentalists had hoped for. You will seldom see a Silverado Hybrid on the road today. The awkward truck model didn’t sell well, and consumers weren’t sold on it.

Photo Credit: GM

1: Chevy Tahoe Hybrid

Another failed attempt at a supersized hybrid was the Tahoe Hybrid. The Tahoe Hybrid hit the market in the midst of the economic recession of 2008. Consumers weren’t looking for gas-guzzling vehicles anymore, and it put a dent in GM’s business (via Car and Driver). The company had to act quickly, and thus the Tahoe Hybrid hit the market. Aside from the abundance of Hybrid badging, there wasn’t a ton of actual improvement.

Photo Credit: GM

The gas mileage was not that much better than the regular Tahoe. But the cost was thousands more, and the truck was limited. The body kits and insufficient off-road capability limited the Tahoe Hybrid to pavement duty. Sales numbers for the Tahoe Hybrid were lackluster at best, and the SUV was ultimately a failure.

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