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Chrysler Cars Drivers Shouldn’t Touch With A 10-Foot Pole

Cameron EittreimOctober 18, 2021

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11: Chrysler Concorde

For much of the 1990s and early 2000s, the Chrysler brand had three distinct sedans for sale. The Concorde, LHS, and 300M. All three of these sedans shared the LH Platform with the Dodge Intrepid. Consumers were privy to this fact because all three cars looked exactly alike. The Concorde suffered from many reliability issues during its run (via Motor Trend).

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Transmission failure was the norm in the Chrysler LH sedans, and that was just the tip of the iceberg. The 2.7L V6 engine is widely considered one of the worst engines Chrysler ever made. Due to a faulty oil level design, the engine would sludge and suffer from catastrophic failure. There were many class-action lawsuits filed against Chrysler because of the horrible engine design.

Photo Credit: Chrysler

10: Chrysler 300M

Another sedan that suffered from a treasure trove of reliability problems was the Chrysler 300M. Chrysler marketed the 300M as a sport sedan, but in reality, it was your run-of-the-mill Intrepid. Its lousy engine designs were the main thing that hampered the 300M. With competition from more experienced automakers, it was hard to justify the cost of a 300M (via Motor Trend).

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Chrysler would replace the 300M in 2005 with the 300C. The latter was a much better car through and through. The cab-forward sedans Chrysler tried to force-feed consumers during the 1990s will go down as notorious lemons. There were much better options drivers could get during this era of automotive design.

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9: Chrysler Imperial

The 1990s were an unusual time for Chrysler as an automotive brand. There was a concerted effort to brand Chrysler as a true luxury brand. With the onset of Lexus and Japanese automakers, Chrysler had to act quickly. The Imperial was a straight-laced luxury sedan that shared the Y platform with many other Chrysler models (via The Truth About Cars).

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The Imperial is a nameplate Chrysler returns to from time to time. However, the final model simply didn’t do much to invigorate the brand. Consumers were looking for more than a jazzed-up K-Car and the Imperial simply didn’t cut the mustard. There were other luxury cars on the market at the time that offered a lot more for the equivalent price.

Photo Credit: Chrysler

8: Chrysler Sebring

Chrysler sold the Sebring alongside the Sebring Convertible for almost two decades. When you think about a lackluster car, the Sebring comes to mind. With a notoriously cheap design, the Sebring sedan was as barebones of a car as you could get. The cheap interior was only magnified by the lack of refinement within the car (via Consumer Affairs).

Photo Credit: Chrysler

The Chrysler Sebring was about as cheap of a car as you could get. It wasn’t the best setup considering that Chrysler is marketed as a fairly upscale brand. With the paltry reliability and questionable build quality, the Sebring missed the mark in more ways than one. Chrysler has since exited the small car market and only the 300C remains.

Photo Credit: Chrysler

7: Sebring Convertible

The Sebring Convertible was launched in 1995 as a 1996 model, replacing the outgoing LeBaron. The styling of the Sebring Convertible was fairly modern with lots of rounded corners. The performance was more than adequate for a convertible, and the pricing was reasonable. Initially, the Sebring Convertible was one of the best-selling Chryslers on the market (via Car and Driver).

Photo Credit: Chrysler

The problem was that the reliability of the Sebring was questionable. As the car aged, there were issues with the transmission and overheating that buyers began to notice. There were also issues with the luxury features malfunctioning, such as the automatic convertible top. Overall, the Sebring has garnered a lackluster reputation as a used car.

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6: Chrysler Laser

For a short period, the Chrysler Laser was the only sports car to bear a Chrysler badge. Developed in partnership with Mitsubishi, the car had a lot going for it. Likewise, there were also many drawbacks to the Laser. The cheap build quality was a major contributor to the lackluster reputation the car had (via Jalopnik).

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The Laser had a full digital dashboard similar to other cars from this era. That same digital dashboard is known for failing as the car ages. There were also issues that pertained to the head gasket and overheating. Overall, the Laser is not the sports car or even one of many Chrysler cars drivers would want to invest time and money into.

Photo Credit: Chrysler

5: Chrysler TC By Maserati

Believe it or not, you’ve read this heading correctly. There was indeed a Chrysler sports car designed by Maserati. Developed in partnership with Maserati to get rid of the ‘blue-collar’ image Chrysler had. The Chrysler TC was built in Italy, and there was a small production run on the car (via Motor Trend).

Chrysler TC by Maserati
Photo Credit: Chrysler

The two-door sports car did not persuade consumers, and like the Cadillac Allante, it quickly faded into obscurity. Chrysler is not the first brand name that comes to mind when you think of an exotic sports car. Justifying the high price tag for the TC wasn’t an easy task and the car was eventually discontinued.

Photo Credit: City Cars

4: Chrysler Pacifica

It was the mid-2000s, and every automaker had to have an SUV model. The Chrysler brand was without an SUV model, and thus the Pacifica was born. The Pacifica was one of the first crossover SUVs to hit the car market. The styling was new in 2004, but nowadays is the norm when you spot a crossover (via Motor Trend).

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From a performance perspective, the Pacifica was underpowered. It competed against a barrage of considerable V8-powered SUVs on the market. The styling was also different from what consumers were used to at the time. The Pacifica didn’t end up being a success for Chrysler and was ultimately discontinued until years later.

Photo Credit: Chrysler

3: Chrysler New Yorker Fifth Avenue

The early 1990s Chrysler New Yorker was a small luxury sedan based on the K Car platform. For many Chrysler models, the K Car platform was fine, but competing against Cadillac and Lincoln took something a bit more substantial. The Fifth Avenue package was supposed to address the concerns of luxury car shoppers (via Hagerty).

Photo Credit: Chrysler

Instead, the car was cheaply designed with an emphasis on interior comfort only. The exterior, drive train, and the rest of the car were all pretty much unchanged. With new competition from Lexus and Acura, the buyers for the Fifth Avenue weren’t there. The car faded into obscurity fairly quickly as Chrysler redirected toward a cab-forward design.

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2: Chrysler LHS

In the 1990s, Chrysler was trying to position the brand even more upmarket than before. The LHS sedan was designed to complete this mission as the most expensive model. Initially, the LHS had some unique features, such as a built-in car phone. But the initial quality of the LHS was questionable at best, and the car eventually faded into obscurity (via The Truth About Cars).

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If you took a look at an old LHS and a Chrysler Concorde, drivers couldn’t tell the difference. Both of these cars were carbon copies of each other and this confused consumers. There were much better luxury sedans on the market than the LHS. Chrysler couldn’t compete with the onslaught of new luxury models coming out.

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1: Chrysler LeBaron GTS

In what was meant to be a performance-oriented car, the LeBaron GTS was a four-door hatchback model. The car was based on the Mitsubishi Lancer at the time and had the same turbocharged four-cylinder engine whereas the main LeBaron Convertible and Sedan were based on a cushier riding platform (via All Par).

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The LeBaron GTS will go down as one of the weirdest Chrysler models. For a brand that had positioned itself as a luxury car brand, the LeBaron GTS was an oddity. The cheap design and tacky appearance of the car made it seem out of place. Chrysler had more than a few of these failures in the late 1980s and early ’90s.

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