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40 ’70s Muscle Cars That Failed To Justify The Hype

Cameron EittreimJuly 15, 2020

Chevrolet Vega Coupe
via: Wikipedia

15: 1971 Chevrolet Vega

GM was in a pinch during the ’70s. The Vega was an attempt to combine a performance car with a gas efficient compact. Unfortunately, it ended up a bug-eyed two-door that looked like a mix of a Camaro and a VW Beetle. The Vega could have been a great car had GM put more effort into it. Instead, the car was almost like a Chevy version of the Mustang II, itself a sorry offering.

Chevrolet Vega
via: Classic Cars Mark

The hole in the lineup left by the more powerful Camaro was not filled by the Vega. Lackluster build quality and an awkward design made the Vega a sore spot in the automotive industry. There were many duds that came out of GM design at the time and the Vega was one of them.

Mustang King Cobra
via: Hot Rod

14: Mustang II King Cobra

The Mustang II was an awful way to follow up on one of the best-selling pony cars ever made. The company decided to release a special edition of the Mustang known as the King Cobra. This isn’t the high-performance Cobra that we have come to know. Instead, this was a Cobra that couldn’t bite. There were some redeeming qualities to this Mustang; the body was very lightweight and modifications weren’t hard.

Mustang King Cobra
via: Hot Rod

The King Cobra was just worth avoiding altogether. It was a much different car then the Cobra that we’ve seen in recent decades. This was a car that was designed during an era of uncertainty in the automotive industry.

1973 Hornet Hatchback
via: Blogspot

13: 1973 Hornet Hatchback

During the ’70s, AMC was attempting to throw anything at the wind to get success. The problem with the cars was that many of them were made from a dated parts catalog. The company was lacking the resources for research and development on future models. The Hornet Hatchback had a reasonable V8 engine, but fuel economy was horrible. Aside from the lackluster fuel economy, the car also had reliability issues.

1973 Hornet Hatchback
via: Blogspot

AMC was pushing the Hornet as a new-age performance car, but in reality, the parts dated back to the ’60s. The AMC V8 engines were aged at best and a lot of the issues caused the cars to lose steam. The Hornet might have stood a better chance if the car was more reliable. The car world will never know since AMC became defunct.

AMC Javelin
via: Hot Rod

12: 1973 AMC Javelin

Another AMC that made the rounds was the Javeli. This performance car was more in line with what consumers were looking for. The stylie choices of the car were great, the body was sleek, and the interior was perfectly sized for the segment. But the V8 under the hood lacked therefinements of other cars on the market, not to mention the fuel crisis. AMC pushed the Javelin for a long period, but the car just couldn’t catch on.

AMC Javelin
via: YTIMG

The brand had a good deal of competition with the other automakers around this period. AMC was eventually purchased by Chrysler with the sole purpose of obtaining the Jeep brand, the most profitable piece of the portfolio. Perhaps had AMC been in better financial condition around this time, the Javelin might have lasted.

AMC Hornet
via: Barnfinds

11: 1971 Hornet 360

The Hornet 360 was the last of the ’60s-era muscle cars to make an appearance during the ’70s. From the onset, the 360 was the best=looking rendition of the Hornet to date. The problem wasn’t with the exterior design of the car; it was with the dated AMC power plants. While most automakers were making improvements to their V8 engines, AMC seemed to be stuck in the past.

AMC Hornet
via: Hemmings

The Hornet 360 has become somewhat of a sought-after collector’s item these days. But back in the ’70s, the hype that surrounded this car was far too much. There were better offerings at this troubled time in the automotive industry. The compact muscle car that came out of AMC had a lot of potential, but the company’s bad financial condition weighed it down.

AMC AMX
via: Silodrome

10: AMC AMX

The AMX stands out as one of the most visually appealing AMC vehicles to ever hit the road. Sadly, underneath the car was nothing more than dated parts. AMC was looking to appeal to a new generation of automotive buyers. The track car design of the AMX gave it a fighting chance against the slew of other performance cars that were being redone.

AMC AMX
via: Wikipedia

These years were the worst for the AMC brand, especially with stringent new emissions laws. No longer could you cram an over-sized engine into a lightweight design because the regulations wouldn’t allow it. With the fuel crisis going on, the car was never able to achieve any sales success.

AMC Rebel Machine
via: Silodrome

9: AMC Rebel Machine

Perhaps one of the most appealing muscle cars to come out of AMC, the Rebel Machine was an interesting proposition. The design of the car looks like a Dodge Challenger, which made the vehicle even more appealing. The interior was huge with plenty of seating. Nevertheless, tots performance was a letdown. The Rebel Machine had a lot of hype behind it as a real American performance car.

AMC Rebel Machine
via: Mecum

But the AMC Rebel Machine was only offered for a single year, 1970. The car didn’t have very much success and nowadays these cars are very rare. The resale value has been rising as modern enthusiasts decide how to swap the engine out with GM V8s and Ford V8s. Sadly this isn’t the General Lee Charger, it’s just a knockoff that never went very far.

Chevrolet Camaro
via: Hot Rod

8: ’70s Chevrolet Camaro

The first generation of the Camaro was a massive sales success for the brand. The pony car managed to take on the wildly successful Ford Mustang. When the redesign came around, the Camaro had lost a lot of its momentum. There was a lot to love with this version of the Camaro, but sadly the V8 was hampered by smog technology.

Camaro Z/28
via: Hot Rod

There were a few special editions of the Camaro such as the Z/28 and the Rally edition. But in the long run, this was probably one of the most overhyped cars ever. The actual production model was a far cry from the Camaro that came before it. The automotive industry hadn’t come far enough yet and the smog enhancements were choking these large engines out.

Firebird Trans AM
via: Hot Rod

7: ’70s Pontiac Firebird

Pontiac also had a tough time during the 1970s with the fuel crisis going on. The Firebird was always the third wheel to the Mustang and the Camaro, which made the Firebird a more distinct offering. Its styling was always different but the ’70s brought the success of the Smokey and the Bandit edition. The Firebird was hampered by the same things as the Camaro. These smog regulations made it extremely difficult for automakers to create high-performance cars.

Firebird Trans AM
via: Hot Rod

The earlier renditions of the second generation F-Body have become highly sought after on the auction block. But later models from the ’70s are generally voidable due to reliability issues and a lack of horsepower. There is no denying that the Firebird was one of the most iconic muscle cars of this generation. But there is a lot that GM could have done better to make the car a more powerful challenger.

Corvette C3
via: Corvsport

6: Chevrolet Corvette (C3)

The Corvette was not above suffering during this era as well. The C3 was a much different car than the Corvette models that came before it. The first reason for this was the fact that the cars had to suffer from the smog regulations and the fuel crisis. Still, GM tried to do things right with this generation by creating a modern Corvette. The curves of the car look great and the factory paint colors were unique. The C3 was available in a Convertible and a T-Top version, both of which were popular choices.

Corvette C3
via: Richmonds

You can find these Corvettes and swap out the engine with a modern LS series engine, which gives the car an immense amount of power. The ’70s might have been a difficult period but the C3 was one of the most over-hyped sports cars. The C3 is often the most underrated Corvette generation. But if you take the time to look at it, the Corvette C3 is also a beautifully designed car that deserves more recognition.

Mustang Mach-1
via: CC Marketplace

5: Ford Mustang Mach 1

Right on the heels of the Pinto-based Mustang II ,the Mach 1 was released to ignite a final bit of fire into the Mustang lineup. The hype that surrounded this Mustang model was immense because there hadn’t been a special edition model in a while. The result was a car that was lacking in power and had a bunch of bolt-ons. Ford made the Mach-1 look good but performance was lacking.

Mustang Mach-1
via: Dealer Accelerate

The values of these Mach-1 models have been steadily increasing. Although this isn’t the best Mach-1 Ford has released, it still has a good deal of nostalgia for it. If you wanted to enjoy a performance ride in the early ’70s. the Mach-1 was a status symbol. The new smog regulations were affecting all performance cars and the Mustang was no exception.

1973 Monte Carlo
via: Barn Finds

4: 1973 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

The 1970 Monte Carlo is one of the most desirable two-door coupes on the market today. With the V8 engine and a look similar to the Chevelle the Monte Carlo was everything done right. The 1973 Chevrolet Monte Carlo looked like a mixture of a Cadillac and a Chevy Caprice. The next generation Monte Carlo was overhyped.

1973 Monte Carlo
via: CC Public Blog

There were a lot of benefits to the car such as a luxurious interior and a host of luxury features. But sadly, this Monte Carlo never lived up to the expectations of the second generation. The car had a lot of reliability issues and the design was questionable at best. Because the fuel efficiency was so important during this period, the Monte Carlo tanked.

1973 Pontiac Grand Prix
via: TRBimg

3: 1973 Pontiac Grand Prix

There are very few GM cars that were hyped as much as the next Grand Prix was during this period. The 1973 Pontiac Grand Prix is downright ugly. The car was based on the same platform as the Monte Carlo and a host of other GM two-doors. Because cars were suffering from the new fuel regulations around this period, the Grand Prix just couldn’t gain leverage.

1973 Pontiac Grand Prix
via: CCPUBLIC

Pontiac was the performance division of the GM brand portfolio at the time. The Grand Prix was a lackluster offering and the car pretty much went downhill from here. As time went on, Pontiac was relegated to a rebranded status among the GM lineup. The Grand Prix had a lot of potential to take Pontiac to the next level. We just can’t figure out what the designers were thinking with that nose job.

Chrysler Cordoba
via: CCMarketplace

2: 1976 Chrysler Cordoba

The ’70s were a tough time for all domestic automakers. Rising gas prices and smog regulations were choking automakers in terms of revenue and horsepower. The problem with the new smog regulations was that the cars were weighed down by heavy bodies and a lack of power. The 1976 Chrysler Cordoba was designed to compete with the Monte Carlo, but the actual car was a mixture of recycled parts.

Chrysler Cordoba
via: Curbside Classic

Although the Cordoba could have built on the success of previous Chrysler performance vehicles, the actual vehicle was lackluster at best. The Cordoba didn’t last very long and the nameplate was retired all together before the turn of the decades. The V8 was notoriously unreliable and the transmission in these cars would go out prematurely as well.

1974 Plymouth Fury
via: Car Domain

1: 1974 Plymouth Fury II

Plymouth was one of the innovating brands during the original muscle car era. So when the Fury was reintroduced during the ’70s things got a little interesting. The styling of the car wasn’t that bad to look at, but performance was lacking. The smog regulations didn’t help and the car was overweight. There were a few interesting aspects to the car such as a luxurious interior.

1974 Plymouth Fury
via: Car Domain

There were quite a few Plymouth coupes that were released during the period. But, the Fury stood out as it shared its platform with the Chrysler Cordoba. Both cars were overhyped at the time and you’d be better off just passing on one altogether. But don’t let the name “fury” fool you because this car is far from furious on the road.

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