Home Cars 50 Classic Muscle Cars Drivers Forgot About Long Ago
Cars

50 Classic Muscle Cars Drivers Forgot About Long Ago

Cameron EittreimJuly 28, 2020

2006 Chevrolet Impala SS
Photo Credit: GM

42: 2006 Chevrolet Impala SS

When GM announced that the Impala SS was returning for the 2006 model year there was much jubilation in the automotive press. While the Impala SS did stand out from the crowd for its unique styling the car got marks against it for being bland in comparison to the Dodge Charger and Chrysler 300C. Even with all of that the Impala SS still pulled decent numbers on the track thanks to the same powerful V8 engine that is shared with the Monte Carlo. The Impala SS was always a comfortable driving family sedan that offered a great amount of performance.

2006 Chevrolet Impala SS
Photo Credit: GM

The 2006 model was bland in the eyes of consumers and thus it didn’t sell as well. But that bolds well for an affordable resale value, and you can find these cars for a bit of nothing. With the right modifications and upgrades, you can turn the 2006 Impala SS into a serious performance sedan that will have a signature bark to it.

2008 Grand Prix GXP
Photo Credit: Car Domain

41: 2008 Grand Prix GXP

The final year for the Grand Prix was one of the most influential in the brand’s history. GM incorporated a new 5.3L V8 engine and it took the car to a whole new level. Coupled with the lightweight W-Body platform the Grand Prix GXP was an exciting car to drive and own. Production numbers were very low for this model and thus it is extremely rare, nevertheless a stellar addition to any collection. With the sleek styling and the luxurious interior, the Pontiac Grand Prix GXP performed well and looked the part.

2008 Grand Prix GXP
Photo Credit: Car Domain

Sadly the sales were not what GM had hoped for in addition to the GXP being slowly phased out for the G8. The next year the Pontiac brand was eventually phased out altogether and the Grand Prix is now a thing of the past. Nevertheless, this is one of the most notable muscle cars that people have forgotten was

1970 Pontiac GTO
Photo Credit: Hagerty

40: 1970 Pontiac GTO

You probably think we’re crazy by including the legendary GTO, but here’s why. The GTO is the most influential muscle car of all time. But the base models have long been forgotten in favor of the most well-known renditions of the car. The Judge is just one of many that take the limelight when you look back on the GTO. The lower-rung GTO variations were also very exciting cars to drive from the factory.

1970 Pontiac GTO
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Although these cars didn’t come with all of the special decals or features, they were still performance powerhouses. The 1970 Pontiac GTO was perhaps the end of an era for the Pontiac line, as the cars progressively lost their unique appeal. The 1970 Pontiac GTO in its average configurations was still a notable muscle car, but has since been forgotten.

1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass 442
Photo Credit: The Iron Garage

39: 1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass 442

There was a time when the automotive industry was filled with different brands all vying for your consumer dollars. The 2008 recession killed off most of these other brands and thus you have the automotive makes that you see today. But Oldsmobile was an influential carmaker with a lot of say in the automotive world. Oldsmobile pioneered the first consumer airbag system in addition to other firsts. The 1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass 442 is often forgotten in the fray of Chevelle SS’s and Buick GNX models.

1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass 442
Photo Credit: The Iron Garage

But if you wanted a real no-frills muscle car at the time, the 1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass 442 was the one to pick. The iconic no-frills look of the car and the masterful performance made the 442 stands out from just about every other car. The performance was notable and the shared platform with the Chevelle made parts dirt cheap.

1972 Ford Mustang
Photo Credit: Mustang 360

38: 1972 Ford Mustang

The early seventies Mustang is often the most forgotten of all of the models. Right on the cusp of the fuel crisis, the car just didn’t farewell. The design was sort of an in-between from the iconic initial model and then the pinto based model that came later on. The exterior styling was polarizing and it didn’t always connect with consumers. Although the car still sold fairly well, base models were often forgotten about.

1972 Ford Mustang Sprint edition fastback
Photo Credit: Car And Driver

A lot of reliability and build quality issues started to creep up during this period as Ford was attempting to cut costs. Lee Iacocca was also absent from this generation of the Mustang as he had moved on to saving Chrysler corporation. The 1972 Mustang is probably one of the most forgotten renditions of the storied car line.

Aston Martin V8 Vantage Volante
Photo Credit: Bring a Trailer

37: Aston Martin V8 Vantage Volante

The Aston Martin Vantage is not an American muscle car, but a muscle car from one of the most important eras. The Aston Martin V8 Vantage Volante was a piece of British engineering at its finest. The Vantage had a stellar V8 powerplant which propelled the car with authority.

Aston Martin V8 Vantage Volante
Photo Credit: Wallpaper Up

On top of that, the Vantage also had one of the most luxurious interiors at the time. The car was featured in many automotive publications for its groundbreaking design. From a practical standpoint, the Vantage didn’t hit with consumers. This is why the car was quickly forgotten about, but you can still find these in excellent condition from time to time.

1985 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
Photo Credit: GM

36: 1985 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS

The eighties isn’t a decade that’s often showcased for muscle cars, but there were a few exceptions. The 1985 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS is one such exception of a car that you could pretty much drive on the track and in town. The powerband was higher then most of the cars from this era and GM had introduced fuel injection into the mix.

1985 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

The GM G-Body cars are some of the most iconic from the end of this era. The 1985 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS was also a major contender on the NASCAR circuit for GM. Winning many championships in the process and cementing the hold that GM has in NASCAR to this day. There aren’t a lot of iconic eighties muscle cars, but the GM G-Body Monte Carlo is one of them.

Jaguar XJS
Photo Credit: Hagerty

35: Jaguar XJS

The Jaguar XJS is not to be confused with other British cars from this era, this was indeed a muscle car. The powerful V-12 engine helped the XJS to drive with a bit of authority, coupled with the beautiful design. Few cars were built with as much precision as the XJS was, and this is a good thing. The Jaguar XJS had a unique design to it that still resonates with buyers to this day.

Jaguar XJS
Photo Credit: Hagerty

The reliability issues caused the car to have a lot of heartache with potential drivers. But if you are willing to put up with the constant maintenance of the XJS, the car is worth driving. The high-class British design of the car coupled with the intriguing V-12 engine will leave a smile on your face with every drive.

Alfa Romeo Montreal
Photo Credit: Classic Car

34: Alfa Romeo Montreal

Even if you’ve never been a fan of Alfa, Montreal is a real treat. Take one look at the GT profile of the car and you’ll know that it’s something special. The Alfa Romeo Montreal wasn’t like anything else that was on the market. Unfortunately, the polarizing design and price have made Montreal a forgotten member of the ’70s muscle car era. It’s not the muscle car that you’d expect, but it stands out from the crowd.

Alfa Romeo Montreal
Photo Credit: Classic Car

The things about the Alfa Romeo Montreal that stood out have made it an instant classic. Values have remained steady in this car and you can find one for a great deal. Whether you are a first-time classic car buyer or an expert, the Alfa Romeo Montreal is worth taking a look at.

Dodge Challenger R/T Hemi Convertible
Photo Credit: Chrysler

33: Dodge Challenger

The Dodge Challenger was one of the most popular muscle cars of all time. But the car was also overshadowed by an array of other muscle cars such as the Chevelle SS and the Oldsmobile 442. What made the Dodge Challenger unique was its wide bodystyle and the powerful Hemi V8 that was under the hood. Few cars have come close to rivaling the Challenger in terms of sheer power.

Dodge Challenger
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Nevertheless, the car was constantly overshadowed and is just recently coming back into popularity. Prices for the Challenger on the used car market have begun to explode, and that’s a good thing. The Dodge Challenger has stood the test of time with an iconic design and a platform that can be built on.

Chevrolet Camaro 2nd Generation
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

32: Chevrolet Camaro 2nd Generation

The second-generation Camaro was built at a bad time in the automotive industry. New EPA regulations were causing automakers to have to cut horsepower ratings dramatically. The newer Camaro was a mere shadow of its former self, and the automotive community responded. The car was much slower and it didn’t have that quality feeling of the original cars. Some cool options could be had, but for the most part, this Camaro was a dud in terms of sales.

Chevrolet Camaro 2nd Generation
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Popularity in the Split Bumper has been starting to rise if you are lucky enough to find one in clean condition. Overall the second-generation Camaro is a piece of muscle car history, but one that often gets overlooked for the other more well-known models.

Chevrolet Corvette (C3)
Photo Credit: Agency Collection

31: Chevrolet Corvette (C3)

Even the Corvette suffered during this generation for muscle cars, with new regulations the design was less than innovative. The car suffered from the same problem as most muscle cars from this era, unimaginative design, and low power. The regulations from the EPA on these types of cars were beginning to choke the performance out. The C3 did have some memorable moments but when you compare it to Corvettes prior, the excitement just wasn’t there.

Chevrolet Corvette (C3)
Photo Credit: Car Domain

There were some special editions of the C3 such as the Stingray, but for the most part, this is a forgettable member of the Corvette family. The thing just doesn’t perform like you’d expect it to in terms of an elite sports car.

Maserati Bora
Photo Credit: Maserati

30: Maserati Bora

If you’ve never laid eyes on the Maserati Bora then you are missing out. The Bora had a polarizing design, which was both a blessing and a curse. The car could dish out some of the best performance you’ve ever seen. But at the same time, it also caused a lot of shake ups in the automotive industry due to its design. Buyers never seemed to warm up to the Bora in what seemed like the right sports car at the wrong period.

Maserati Bora
Photo Credit: Maserati

Maserati is not the first automaker that comes to mind when you think about muscle cars. But the Bora was every bit the muscle car that many other models were. With a powerful V8 engine and enough horsepower to make serious dents at the track, the Bora is a classic car that was forgotten too soon.

De Tomaso Pantera
Photo Credit: Classic Driver

29: De Tomaso Pantera

Want a Ford GT40 for thousands less? Well, the De Tomaso Pantera was knocked for being a redneck GT40, but the car is the same thing. The Ford derived V8 engine and suspension are both the same as what you’d find in the GT40. The car has a lot of potential behind it and even today you can find one for a reasonable price. The De Tomaso Pantera was disregarded by the automotive community and it was quickly forgotten, but that benefits potential buyers of the car.

De Tomaso Pantera
Photo Credit: Classic Driver

With a polarizing design and fun to drive demeanor, the De Tomaso Pantera is a pretty unique piece of automotive history. The car has everything that you’d expect in a vehicle of this price range, all wrapped up in a budget-friendly Ford GT40 clone.

Pontiac Trans Am
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

28: Pontiac Trans Am

The Pontiac brand in general is a relic of a better time in the automotive industry. There was a lot to offer from the high-performance cars of this period, and the Trans Am was at the forefront. The Smokey and the Bandit Trans Am is of course the most well-known in the lineup, but the base Firebird models from this era are quickly forgotten. A lack of horsepower and EPA interference made these cars a nightmare to own.

Pontiac Trans Am
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

GM was not as innovative with this generation of the F-Body and as such most classic car collectors try to steer clear of this gen. Nevertheless, if you can find one of the special-edition Trans Am models you’ll be in for a car that offers some serious fun.

Ferrari 512 BB
Photo Credit: Best Car Mag

27: Ferrari 512 BB

Few Ferrari models from this era managed to leave an impression on the minds of automotive enthusiasts. The 512 BB was one such car, offering a dizzying array of features and an odd-ball engine setup. Because of the fuel crisis around this time, the Ferrari 512 BB was not the most practical vehicle on most buyers’ shopping lists.

Ferrari 512 BB
Photo Credit: Wall Paper Up

The car was horrible on gas and it had a polarizing design that was tough for a lot of buyers to accept. Ferrari made several odd-ball cars during this period and the Ferrari 512 BB was one of them. Even with the semi-innovative design and the 512 BB just never caught on like many of the other Ferrari models before and after it.

BMW M1
Photo Credit: BMW

26: BMW M1

The M1 was meant to be the German muscle car with spirit, but a lackluster advertising campaign and questionable reliability made the car a lackluster choice. There are few cars from this era that had the mid-engined design of the M1. But the performance of the straight-six wasn’t what the company had hoped for and the buying public didn’t warm up to it. The M1 was not the most unique BMW of the decade, but the designers certainly tried to make it stand out from the crowd.

BMW M1
Photo Credit: BMW

The muscle car era was a time chalked full of unique cars that attempted to capture the free spirit of America. The designers behind the BMW M1 were ambitious at the time, but the novelty of the car has since faded.

AMC
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

25: AMC Rebel Machine

There was a time when American automakers ruled the roost. The gas-guzzling AMC Rebel Machine was the last of an era. Parts were hard to come by and reliability was scarce, yet performance was decent. The Rebel Machine was a special trim package on the base Rebel. Unfortunately, enthusiasts aren’t too interested in old AMC models these days.

AMC Rebel
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

The Rebel Machine was an interesting concept from a company on the verge of collapse. AMC tried everything they could to incite interest in the new product lines. Sadly, the Rebel Machine was a failed attempt to captivate an already satisfied muscle car market.

AMC Hornet SC/360
Photo Credit: Car Domain

24: AMC Hornet SC/360

At one point in time the automotive market was almost completely dominated by domestic companies. AMC was one of the originals, but got lost in a decline of technology and resources. V8 coupes were one of the company’s focal points while the muscle car era was ripe. The Hornet SC/360 was another two-door positioned to be a serious contender in the muscle car world.

AMC Hornet SC/360
Photo Credit: Car Domain

Some features of the Hornet were well designed. The interior was spacious for its small outward appearance. AMC could have done a lot with the Hornet, but the company was in a bad spot. However, the Hornet is a relatively inexpensive and rare muscle car.

Photo Credit: Hot Rod

23: Buick Wildcat

Buick is often overlooked when discussing the muscle car era. The brand had a few cars on the market during this time that shared a lot of components with Pontiac and Chevy models. The Wildcat is one such example and a car that you don’t hear about. The rarity was based on the Chevrolet Impala of the time, and featured a powerful Nailhead 425 c.i. V8 engine.

Buick Wildcat
Photo Credit: Car Domain

There’s a good chance that you haven’t heard about the Wildcat. The car didn’t sell as well as other muscle cars on the market around this time. Yet the Wildcat offers a stellar choice for a rare muscle car with an attractive exterior style. Buick muscle cars were often underrated during this period.

Photo Credit: GM

22: Chevrolet Monte Carlo

After a mediocre production time during the 1990s and early 2000s, the Monte Car is often overlooked as a muscle car. But there was a time when the Monte Carlo offered a good deal of horsepower. Luxury features were appointed throughout the interior and the Monte Carlo was pushed as a luxury coupe. The overall exterior style of the car was similar in shape to the Chevelle SS.

Photo Credit: Hot Rod

The Monte Carlo is worth considering if you’re in the market for a muscle car. There is a lot of potential with the car for upgrades. A common choice for the Monte Carlo is to upgrade the engine to a modern LS motor. Whether you keep the car factory or upgrade it, the Monte Carlo is a winning combination.

Chrysler 300 Hurst
Photo Credit: Chrysler

21: Chrysler 300 Hurst

Chrysler is a brand that is constantly overlooked in the muscle car race. But the company had quite a few stellar muscle cars you might not know about. The 300 Hurst had long, flowing lines and an aggressive stance. The roots of the Hurst can be seen in the other muscle cars of the era. A nice set of factory Rallye rims gave the car a mean look on the race track. Sadly Chrysler didn’t build up as much of a reputation as other brands on the market.

Chrysler 300 Hurst
Photo Credit: Car Domain

While the modern 300C is a popular car, the classic model is often unknown. A new generation of drivers is unaware this car existed because it never gets publicity. There were a lot of attributes of the 300 Hurst that could have used improvement, such as its heavy curb weight. Overall, the 300 Hurst had a lot of potential as a muscle car that you can get for next to nothing.

Dodge Coronet
via: Hot Rod

20: Dodge Coronet

The Coronet was everything from a police car to a performance car. Dodge didn’t exactly go all out with it, but it got the job done. The Coronet was in its prime as a California Highway Patrol vehicle in 1976. The lightweight design was a surprise considering just how big the car was. Performance was a strong suit for the Coronet and the car was incredibly nimble. There was a lot the Coronet brought to the table, but the car just didn’t have the notoriety.

Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Still, the Coronet is worth taking a look at if you want a powerful muscle car on a budget. The overall design of the car has a lot of potential and there are a lot of aftermarket mods. With a modern Hemi swap and a few additions, the Coronet can be a powerful track car or weekend hot rod.

Dodge Dart
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

19: Dodge Dart

The classic Dodge Dart was a far cry from the modern Dart compact we saw a few years ago. The Dart never gained much notoriety as a muscle car because of its small size. From the onset, the Dart looked to be an underpowered car with a lot of quality issues. However, when you compare the Dart to the current price of other classics there is a lot of potential. It’s not hard to cram a modern Hemi into one.

Dodge Dart
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Interior-wise, the Dart wasn’t anything special. The usual Chrysler flair from this period is evident throughout the car. If you can find one in the clean condition you’ll see a lot of vinyl and upholstery that was usual for this period. Overall, the Dart is a forgotten classic worth looking into.

Dodge Dart
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

18: Ford Fairlane

You rarely hear about Ford during the muscle car era aside from the Mustang. But there were quite a few Ford models that offered performance. The Fairlane was one of the most underrated muscle cars of the era. Engine choices for the Fairlane were the 289 and the 390. Both of them were a great choice at the time and gave the car a great rivalry with the GTO.

Ford Fairlane
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

There was a lot of potential with the Fairlane. But at the time, Ford was focused on selling the Mustang. Had the Fairlane received a bigger push from the company, the car might be more recognizable today. Still, if you can get your hands on one of these, you’ll have a great muscle car.

Ford 7-Litre
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

17: Ford 7-Litre

This is a car you truly don’t see very often. The Ford 7-Litre was based on the Galaxy 2-door. This special-edition car had an elongated body style that looked much bigger than any other muscle car on the road. But the power delivery at the time was top notch and you still got the interior volume of a family car. The car was a lot more nimble then you’d expect a vehicle with a curb weight like this to have.

Ford 7-Litre
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Overall, if you can get your hands on one, the Ford 7-Litre just might be one of the most understated muscle cars on the road due to its design and performance you get from the stock motor. Sure, it’s as big as a land yacht, but it’s still fun to drive.

Mercury Comet
Photo Credit: Wikipedia

16: Mercury Comet

Throughout its life cycle, Mercury was often a dropping point for cloned Ford models. The brand worked to have an indentity of its own, but many of their cars were just questionable Fords. The Comet started life out as a Ford Falcon clone, but later on in the production cycle, it got an upgrade. The performance was a key point in differentiating the Comet from its corporate cousin. The car came with a more than capable 390 V8 that packed a whopping 335HP.

Mercury Comet
Photo Credit: Barnfinds

Upgrading the factory engine is a great way to increase performance. The Comet is a capable street machine fairly unknown to the general public. If you can get your hands on one, there is a lot of potential. Ford did a great job of designing a big car that could either go fast or cruise down the boulevard right from the factory.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

15: Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser

The Vista Cruiser was a Chevelle built for the family. You’ve probably seen this car on ‘That ’70s Show,’ but did you know the Vista Cruiser was a muscle car? This wagon had power right out of the factory combined with family comfort and three-row seating. Oldsmobile put special detail into the design of the Vista Cruiser to separate it from the Chevelle wagon. The 442 engine was the top-of-the-line powerplant at the time.

Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser
Photo Credit: Car Domain

There was a special edition of the Vista Cruiser that came with the 442 engine. With its performance and suspension, the Vista Cruiser was solid. You don’t find these very often anymore, but if you can get your hands on one, the car is a stellar choice.

Oldsmobile Toronado
Photo Credit: GM

14: Oldsmobile Toronado

If you were at all familiar with the muscle car era, the Toronado was a beast on the track. The imposing size of the car and aggressive stance made it stand out. Oldsmobile was quick to equip the car with several interesting features. The later models of the Toronado were the first vehicles on the road to have a supplemental restraint system (airbag). It was innovations like these that gave the Toronado a head start.

Oldsmobile Toronado
Photo Credit: GM

When it comes to muscle cars, the Toronado is one of the most underrated. Performance was second to none at the time. To this day, the Toronado is still a great car that delivers high performance at a reasonable price. Plus, the Oldsmobile brand is a defunct piece of American automotive history.

Photo Credit: Reddit

13: Ford Ranchero GT

GM had the El Camino SS, so Ford had something up the company sleeve to compete. The Ranchero GT is a very rare and unique offering you don’t see often. With the GT package, you got a car that could handle business on the street or the track. The truck bed was longer than the El Camino by quite a few inches.

Photo Credit: Reddit

Horsepower was comparable to the El Camino although the liters were less than the big block 454. If you want a unique hot rod, the Ranchero GT is it. The rarity makes the Ranchero GT a cool ride. Plus, you could always swap the motor out with a Coyote V8 and have a modern-day muscle car.

Pontiac Catalina 2+2
Photo Credit: Car Domain

12: Pontiac Catalina 2+2

The Pontiac GTO gets all the glory as ae historic muscle car, but the Catalina was along for the ride as well. The Pontiac Catalina 2+2 was a lesser-known model than the iconic GTO, but the car had a similar style. Although the Catalina was quite large in terms of curb weight, the car had a lot of performance behind it. The Catalina had a lot of potential for upgrades.

Pontiac Catalina 2+2
Photo Credit: Pontiac

Without the notoriety of the GTO badge, the car is much more affordable. Pontiac were some of the most influential vehicles of the muscle car era. The Catalina can still be a great ride for colectors with a little bit of effort. The car is known as a performance powerhouse and drivers can find a lot of accessories for it.

Chevrolet Laguna
Photo Credit: Barnfinds

11: Chevrolet Laguna 454

Not to be confused with the Monte Carlo it resembles, the Chevrolet Laguna 454 was the ultimate sleeper. Not much is known about this car because you rarely ever seen one anymore. However, the Laguna was a performance powerhouse disguised as a modest two-door coupe. Its 454 V8 engine coupled with a manual transmission made the Laguna a strong entry in the muscle car race.

Chevrolet Laguna 454
Photo Credit:: Car Domain

Rarity was one of the factors with the Laguna as it wasn’t as popular as other models. If you can find a Laguna 454, you’re in for a performance treat. The rear-wheel-drive design and powerful engine make for an exciting experience. Very few cars can match the excitement the Laguna can bring to the table.

Studebaker Avanti R2
Photo Credit: Car Domain

10: Studebaker Avanti R2

The Studebaker Avanti R2 is a car that packs a punch. Studebaker was near the end of the road during this period, but that doesn’t mean that Avanti was a bad choice. The car was lightweight and had rear-wheel drive, which gave it a ton of power to work with. The R2 was the last-ditch effort to generate hype. The 300 HP engine was blazingly fast, but the car’s awkward styling didn’t catch on with consumers.

Studebaker Avanti R2
Photo Credit: Car Domain

Although Studebaker went the way of the wind, you can still find these from time to time. With a little bit of work and love, you can make one of these a pretty piece of automotive history. The Avanti R2 still manages to garner attention when you take it out on the road.

Plymouth Fury GT
Photo Credit: Chrysler

9: Plymouth Fury GT

Plymouth fell on hard times at the start of the new millennium and today’s group of new drivers doesn’t even know it existed. The Fury GT was a muscle car that deserves more love than it gets. There were a lot of good things about the Fury that made it stand out. The powerful Hemi V8 engine was coupled with the rear-wheel-drive design. There was nothing about the Fury that made it worth ignoring, but you just don’t see these anymore.

Plymouth Fury GT
Photo Credit: Fury

Resale prices on the Fury have continued to rise in recent years as this is a piece of Mopar history. The Fury doesn’t have the notoriety of a Dodge Charger, but the car is still a blast to drive. With a little bit of work, the Fury can tango with some of the best classic muscle cars on the road.

Dodge Lil' Red Express Truck
Photo Credit: Reddit

8: Dodge Lil’ Red Express Truck

Dodge was tuning up fast farm trucks long ago, and the Dodge Lil’ Red Express Truck is an example. The bright red truck with tall stacks is a prime example of innovation at its best. The powerful engine gave the truck a lot of torque to work with and off-the-line performance was excellent. This isn’t your average rock crusher or lifted 4X4, but an early example of what a street truck could be.

Dodge Lil' Red Express Truck
Photo Credit: Car Domain

The Dodge Lil’ Red Express Truck is a very rare vehicle and to see one is a surprise. If you can get your hands on an original, you’ll be driving a piece of Mopar history. There are very few pickup trucks still on the road today that are as iconic as the Dodge Lil’ Red Express Truck.

Chevrolet Kingswood 427
Photo Credit: GM

7: Chevrolet Kingswood 427

The Chevrolet Kingswood 427 was a wagon with attitude. The Kingswood was often overshadowed by the Impala and the Caprice, but this was one heck of a station wagon. The 427 V8 was a powerful way to go grocery shopping, and the roomy interior meant long trips were a breeze. Its 398 HP from the factory rivaled some of the most powerful cars of today.

Chevrolet Kingswood 427
Photo Credit: Car Domain

Performance is something that the muscle car world was big on. The roomy trunk was the focal point of the wagon and the three rows of seats were comfortable. The Chevrolet Kingswood 427 is perhaps one of the most underrated station wagons on the road.

Mercury Marauder X-100
Photo Credit: Hagerty

6: Mercury Marauder X-100

Mercury is a brand that was often overrated. But there were quite a few iconic cars that came out of the brand. The Marauder was a muscle car with a lot of attitudes. Mercury marketed the car as a police package and a standard consumer package. The 429 CID V8 engine gave the car a good deal of performance to work with.

Mercury Marauder
Photo Credit: Barnfinds

You don’t see very many of these around, but its power rivaled anything that you could get on the market. The Mercury Marauder X-100 is among one of the most underrated performance vehicles on the market. The resale value of the car is reasonable enough that you can build it up easily.

King Cobra Mustang II
Photo Credit: Ford

5: Ford Mustang II

As the muscle car era was coming to an end and the fuel crisis was happening, Ford had to act fast. The pony car was fun to drive, but Ford had to increase fuel efficiency. The Mustang II was based on one of the worst cars ever, the Pinto. Still, the underrated Mustang II had some pretty special features such as a King Cobra option. The lightweight design with a V8 helped things out.

Ford Mustang II
Photo Credit: Ford

Whichever way that you look at it, the Ford Mustang II was an underrated pony car. There was a lot of potential, but the Pinto design deterred a lot of buyers. The Mustang II is one of the rarest examples of the Mustang and a clean example is still a classic ride.

1970s
Photo Credit: hotrod.com

4: Ford Torino Cobra

There are many different variations of the Torino lineup, and one that stands out particularly is the Torino Cobra. This was a large muscle car that was dominant on the track. Unfortunately, around this time period, there were a lot of other cars taking up the spotlight. Ford’s own Mustang commanded a lot of attention compared to the Torino.

1970s
Photo Credit: Bring a Trailer

Naturally, Ford had to up the ante with the Torino Cobra, which boasted a 429 Cobra Jet engine. If you feel like you’ve seen the Torino Cobra before, it’s because this is the car that went toe-to-toe with the Plymouth Superbird in the early Nascar days. The Torino Cobra is a well-built example of an underrated muscle car, one that has a great deal of potential even to this day thanks to its stellar design.

Chevrolet Biscayne 427
Photo Credit: Speednik

3: Chevrolet Biscayne 427

There are many unique Chevrolet models that have made their way onto the market. The Biscayne 427 has a special place in the hearts of enthusiasts. The big Biscayne was comfortable and performance was also satisfactory. GM managed to pack one of the most iconic engines into the Biscayne. These days there are a number of aftermarket parts that can give the Biscayne a significant boost. GM also sells crate engines of the current LS series that can turn the Biscayne into a modern-day hot rod.

Chevrolet Biscayne 427
Photo Credit: Wallpaperup

The Chevrolet sedans from this time period were performance machines. The base of the Biscayne 427 has a lot of potential. You can build one of these cars into something great and spend a lot less than you would on a comparable Bel Air. These forgotten Chevrolet sedans are worth checking out.

Ford Torino Talladega
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

2: 1969 Ford Torino Talladega

Although the Mustang is probably the best-known Ford sports car on the market, the Torino Talladega is a forgotten piece of history. The first thing that makes the Talladega a historic muscle car is the fact that it was part of the Ford NASCAR platform. The Talladega was quite heavy in terms of curb weight but its powerful engine made up for it. The interior was well-appointed for the time and offered a great blend of comfort.

1969 Ford Torino Talladega
Photo Credit: Car Domain

Finding a Ford Torino Talladega is not as easy as the more common Mustang. But the potential of this car was astounding. Performance was more than satisfactory for the price you can find one of these for. The Ford Torino is one of the most iconic muscle cars drivers have forgotten about.

Pontiac Grand Prix SJ
Photo Credit: Mecum

1: 1969 Pontiac Grand Prix SJ

There is no denying the Pontiac brand was a prominent part of early automotive industry. When you thought about a performance car, the Pontiac Grand Prix was one of the most iconic. The Grand Prix SJ was based on the same platform as the Monte Carlo. Aside from the awful-looking front clip, the Grand Prix SJ was a solid car. You can find these from time to time for a reasonable price.

Pontiac Grand Prix SJ
Photo Credit: Dealer Accelerate

Upgrading one of these can be done for close to nothing and the car can perform with the best. There are other muscle cars from this era that look a lot better. But the Grand Prix SJ is a well-appointed muscle car designed to offer an alternative to the Monte Carlo. Pontiac is now defunct and this car is a historic piece of the automotive industry.

Advertisement
Please wait 5 sec.