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The 20 Best and Influential Pontiacs Ever Made That Most Car Enthusiasts Never Forget

Vukasin HerbezAugust 10, 2018

  1. 2002 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am WS6

By the early 2000s, the Firebird/Camaro combo was outdated with its live rear axle and big weight. And the market wanted more modern and lighter muscle cars. The 2002 model year marked the end of the road for the Firebird. So, Pontiac decided to go out with a bang. They introduced one of the best, fastest and most powerful Trans Ams they ever made.

It was the menacing WS6 version. The WS6 was a handling package on the Trans Am available before that time. But in the 2002 model year, it represented the best of what Pontiac had to offer. With the venerable 5.7-liter V8 engine with 325 HP, a six-speed manual transmission and numerous suspension upgrades, the 2002 WS6 could accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in 4.8 seconds.

That proved that Pontiac still knew how to make a brutal, lightning-quick muscle car. The exterior featured the big Ram Air hood and a sleek rear spoiler. That made the Trans Am WS6 quite a looker despite having a 10-year-old design. So, if you can, pick one of these cars since they are the definitive future muscle car classics.

  1. Pontiac G8

They presented the Pontiac G8 in 2008 and discontinued it in 2010, right before the Pontiac brand was gone. The reason this relatively new car is on this list is simple. Car enthusiasts and customers quickly forgot the G8, even when it was new. Yet it was a true performance sedan and a proper rear-wheel-drive model.

To revive their performance image, Pontiac imported Australian-built Holden cars to re-badge them as Pontiacs. The first car was the Holden Monaro. They gave it a new old name: Pontiac GTO. Despite the 400 HP engine and convincing performance, the GTO wasn’t the success Pontiac wanted.

The next car was the G8 they conceived as the Holden Commodore. Pontiac thought a rear-wheel-drive sedan would help them fight their European competitors. And with the redesign and small-block V8 engines, it was an effective performance sedan, too. The base engine was a solid 3.5-liter V6 with 256 HP.

But the real deal was the G8 GXP with 6.2-liter V8 and 415 HP. The G8 came with high levels of standard equipment, as well as a lot of optional extras. Unfortunately, car customers weren’t ready to accept a G8 performance sedan that could beat those overpriced European models.

After years of anemic models, front-wheel-drive economy cars and the minivans of the ’90s, Pontiac lost its performance image. Only a handful of buyers remembered what they were capable of anymore. So, when they finally presented a car to reclaim their title of a performance brand, it was too late.

In two years, Pontiac sold over 30,000 G8s. Interestingly, the platform and the concept lived on in the form of the Chevrolet SS, a highly praised car. However, it was that last Pontiac that people have forgotten.

  1. Pontiac Trans Am 455

The 1971 Firebirds and Trans Ams were practically identical to the 1970 models. Still, they represented one of the best muscle cars on the rapidly changing market. And 1971 proved to be the last true muscle car model year buyers could get those high powered and legendary engines.

The 455 V8 delivered 335 HP. But most muscle car enthusiasts argue that Pontiac underrated the numbers. Even with the higher compression in the Trans Am H.O. version, that 455 V8 had the same horsepower figure. So, the real output was closer to 400 HP with a corresponding performance and top speeds.

  1. Pontiac Aztec

The Aztec was not a popular car but it is on this list since it is one of the most memorable Pontiacs ever. Pontiac introduced the Aztek in 2000. It was a good idea, on paper at least. The mid-size crossover model came with sharp new styling, a decent engine lineup and plenty of interior space. It was a modern concept at the time.

Pontiac was eager to present it to the public since the overall sales of the brand were slipping. They thought a new model will boost the popularity of the brand and bring new customers to the dealerships. The plan was sound, except for the design. Somehow, those Pontiac designers managed to draw and push to production one of the ugliest cars they ever made.

Every design component of the car is extremely ugly. In fact, even the interior is questionable. However, over a decade after they stopped producing them, Azteks are popular. This is mostly due to an appearance in the cult TV show, Breaking Bad. Also, the Aztek won many first places in “ugliest car” lists.

  1. Pontiac Banshee I

The Banshee I was the first in a long line of Pontiac concept cars that had an influence on production models. The first one to emerge in 1964 was extremely advanced with compact dimensions, a lightweight body and a powerful engine. Pontiac conceived it as a “Mustang killer.” But GM was afraid that a sports coupe from Pontiac could affect their Corvette sales, so they canceled the project.

Most car fans think that’s too bad since the Banshee I had the potential to be a fantastic car. GM even incorporated several design cues into the next generation Corvette. Today, both prototypes have survived: one silver coupe and one white convertible. But what would have happened if GM allowed Pontiac to build the Banshee and changed sports car history?

  1. Pontiac Catalina 2+2

In the mid-60s, the Pontiac GTO was on the forefront of the exciting new muscle car movement. And the GTO was stealing the headlines, but Pontiac also had the Catalina 2+2. The regular Catalina was a great looking, decent selling model. And in 2+2 form, it transformed into a true Gran Turismo with a luxury interior and fire-breathing engine.

Since the Catalina was a full-size model, it was eligible for engines over 400 CID, according to the GM rules of the time. This meant that the Catalina 2+2 came with the famous 421 V8. But, if you wanted, you could get the Tri-Power intake system. That system was the same as on the GTO, boosting the power to 376 HP.

  1. 1967 Pontiac GTO

The GTO was the undisputed king of the muscle car movement. But in 1967, this model received an important mechanical update, keeping it on the top. Design-wise, they changed little, but under the hood, it was significant.

The venerable 389 V8 with the Tri Power option was gone. Pontiac replaced it by the new 400 V8 which came with the famous Ram Air intake system. This change allowed the GTO to deliver even better performance numbers. Also, it opened the doors to more powerful and faster cars from Pontiac.

  1. Pontiac Grand Prix GXP

Despite the name, most people didn’t consider the Pontiac Grand Prix to be a performance car. So, by the early 2000s, it was just an ordinary GM sedan. However, Pontiac presented the GXP package and suddenly, the front wheel drive Grand Prix was a hot performance car. The GXP package consisted of a 5.3-liter V8 with 303 HP going to the front axle.

Also, it got a revised suspension and gearbox. This transformed this family sedan into a highway missile. The GM engineers invested a lot of time to make this front wheel drive car handle like a European performance sedan. The GXP even had wider front wheels than the back to fight torque steering and improve road holding.

  1. Pontiac Solstice GXP

Although the Solstice GXP Coupe sports car couldn’t save the company, it was one of the best Pontiacs they ever made. This is because it was a competent little car with great potential. Pontiac envisioned it as a little sports coupe to fight the Audi TT and BMW Z4.

But, the Solstice GXP Coupe was faster and nimbler than most of its rivals. With a 2.4-liter turbocharged engine and 260 HP on tap, the Solstice GXP Coupe delivered a vivid performance and competent handling. Unfortunately, not a lot people understand the value of this great model.

  1. Pontiac Trans Sport

Back in the early ’90s, minivans were as popular as SUVs are today. And GM had several models for eager buyers. But one of the most interesting was the Pontiac Trans Sport they produced from 1989 to 1999.

The Trans Sport wowed car customers with its spacey styling and enormous interior space. Also, it came with some unusual features, like sliding rear doors. The basic technical layout was conventional, but the design really stole the show. However, the sales were good and people still remember the cool looking Pontiac minivan from the ’90s.

  1. Pontiac El Catalina

In 1960, Pontiac wanted to expand their portfolio. They even thought of producing some sort of light delivery vehicle or truck. The closest thing GM had was the popular Chevrolet El Camino they based on a full-size Chevy car platform. So, the Pontiac R&D department took the El Camino and mounted its own 1960 Catalina body.

Then they chopped and reshaped with the El Camino rear glass and truck bed. They called the finished concept the El Catalina. And it was more beautiful and elegant than the El Camino. Interestingly, GM didn’t have anything against the project. But Pontiac decided it wasn’t worth the investment since the market was small and management didn’t want to gamble.

These are the 20 best, most important and memorable Pontiacs they ever made. Some are older than others, but they all share one thing: they changed automotive history. Which one would you drive if you had the chance? Many car fans would like to see some of the older models make a comeback. And who knows, maybe they will someday.

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