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These Legendary Muscle Cars Give Boomers Something To Rant About

Cameron EittreimOctober 11, 2022

Sports cars have long been one of the most popular automotive segments. The focus on muscle cars reached its peak during the ’60s and ’70s era of the auto industry. But some sports cars have not been all that exciting regardless of their intentions. Cars like the Ford Mustang II were absolute failures on the heels of the highly popular models, giving drivers something to rant about.

The second-generation Camaro and Firebird were another group of sports cars that could have been better because of their hype. We looked back at all-time great sports cars that will spark any conversation. Whether these sports cars were truly that great is up for debate. Some of these sports cars were well-known in their time while others were highly criticized.

Photo Credit: Mecum

Pontiac Trans Am Turbo

Every baby boomer remembers the Pontiac Trans Am Turbo because of its appearance in the movie Smokey and the Bandit. Who could forget Sally Fields’ hair flowing in the wind as she and Burt Reynolds zoomed down the highways? The car truly was an iconic-looking vehicle with many unique aspects. From the gold honeycomb wheels to the dazzling black and gold pinstripe, the Trans Am Turbo was unlike any other muscle car on the road (via Driving Line).

Photo Credit: Mecum

The strikingly beautiful paint job is still popular to this day. There has been a completely new generation of enthusiasts who have found solace in the design of the Firebird. It is a shame that the Pontiac brand no longer sees the light of day.

Photo Credit: Mecum

Ford Mustang Boss 351

The Mustang Boss 351 was the next generation of the famous pony car. Unfortunately, to the dismay of enthusiasts, the Boss 302 and Boss 429 versions were discontinued. There were only 1800 examples of the Boss 351 put into production. The car was fairly rare at the time and has maintained that rarity today as a result (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Mecum

The Boss 351 was a letdown for many loyalists who hoped the car would be as fun as the first generation. The styling of the second-generation Mustang is often considered one of the ugliest in the history of the model overall.

1970 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 via Motor 1
Photo Credit: Motor 1

Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Second Generation

The 1970s were a tough time for automakers, especially domestic ones. The Camaro and the Firebird models were both vastly underpowered compared to the outgoing models and the cars suffered because of it. The new emissions and fuel regulations were harsh and therefore limited the cars significantly. The Camaro Z/28 was a success for GM, but the second generation of the car fell short due to the times (via Classic Car).

1971 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 via Motor 1
Photo Credit: Motor 1

The problem with all the new EPA regulations was that automakers were not able to adapt that quickly. Thus, most muscle cars from the 1970s were underpowered and sluggish compared to the previous generation. The second generation of the Camaro was often referred to as the least popular generation of the pony car as a result.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

Plymouth Barracuda 440

Overall, there were more than a few great Plymouth that came out during the muscle car era. The Barracuda 440 was restyled for the 1970 model year. The new 375 HP V8 engine was powerful and impressive. The Barracuda 440 was a sales success released on the verge of the fuel embargo. There were many reasons why the Plymouth Barracuda 440 was successful, but its performance was the main one (via GR Auto Gallery).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

Shortly after this generation of the Barracuda 440, the car was dramatically downsized. As was the case with many muscle cars from the 1970s and ’80s, it had significantly less performance due to increased emissions regulations.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

Plymouth Fury GT

It’s hard to believe that Plymouth was once a focal point in the automotive industry. Nowadays, most modern drivers don’t even know what Plymouth was. But the nameplate was responsible for some well-known automotive makes. The Fury GT was one such car that turned out to be a success story (via Hot Cars).

Photo Credit: Mopar

The Fury GT wasn’t the most well-known muscle car on the market, but there was a solid following because of its overall popularity. There were various models of the Fury that came to fruition, although the car never achieved the success Chrysler hoped for. The Fury GT was one of the least-known performance cars to come out of Mopar.

AMC Hornet SC/360
Photo Credit: Car Domain

AMC Hornet 360

The AMC brand was an instrumental part of the American automotive industry. But by the time the 1960s and ’70s rolled around the brand was on the way to extinction because of many reasons. The AMC Hornet 360 was the final hurrah. The graphics package and the 360 V8 were decent options for a compact muscle car (via Hemmings).

AMC Hornet SC/360
Photo Credit: Car Domain

Nevertheless, the reliability of the V8 engine was questionable at best and the company didn’t have the money to invest in R&D for their products. If AMC was a better-funded company, the Hornet 360 could have been more popular. The Hornet 360 never sold well and the car was discontinued as a result.

Foto Credit: Hagerty

Oldsmobile Jetfire

The Oldsmobile brand was one of the most influential of the muscle car era. There was a time when the Oldsmobile brand was synonymous with technology and performance (via OldsJetfire.com). Its Jetfire was a futuristic-looking muscle car with a lot of performance behind it.

Foto Credit: Auto WP

Aside from the excellent performance, there was also a lot of new technology in the car. The Jetfire was not the success Oldsmobile hoped for and its futuristic design was partly to blame. Nowadays, however, the Jetfire has become a collector’s item because of it. The innovation used in the Jetfire gave the car a competitive edge.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

AMC Javelin

AMC was once one of the big Detroit automakers, but the company fell on hard times in the 1970s and ’80s. There were other four-seat sports cars on the market at the time, but the Javelin had a unique look. The styling was unorthodox compared to other sports cars on the market at the time (via Hemmings).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

But despite this, its engine was unreliable and its interior quality was cheaply made. It wasn’t a success for AMC and the car was discontinued as a result. The Javelin was one of many cars that contributed to the downfall of AMC. The muscle car segment was crowded during this era and the Javelin didn’t do anything to separate itself.

Foto Credit: Mecum

Chevrolet Bel Air Fuelie

The mainstream Bel Air was well known in hot rod and muscle car circles. But one of the lesser-known models was the Chevrolet Bel Air Fuelie. The Fuelie was the most advanced production vehicle at the time. It had the first modern fuel injection system and was capable of producing 283 HP (via Auto Evolution).

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The fuel injection method was more fuel efficient than other carburated motors on the road. The problem was that the engine was not the most reliable and thus the fuel was generally regarded as a failure. Fuel injection was the norm by the ’90s, and it’s interesting to see how far the technology has come.

Ford Galaxie - Car
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Ford 7-Litre

What exactly was the Ford 7-Liter? It was a car supposed to be slotted between the Mustang and the Thunderbird. The 7-Liter was a forgotten luxury sports car that many have already forgotten about. The entire production run only consisted of 11,000 models, making the car extremely rare (via Hemmings).

Ford Galaxie - Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner
Photo Credit: Mecum

Its 428 horsepower output was respectable at the time, but the car was large and the performance was barely felt. The Ford 7-Liter was the product of a company assuming what the consumer wanted, instead of learning the marketplace. Incidentally, the 7-Liter was only manufactured for a single production year.

Photo Credit: Ford

Ford Thunderbird Supercharged

The Thunderbird was one of the most popular car models Ford ever sold. There were many variations of the Thunderbird that came out over the years. The unique styling of the car and reasonable performance made it popular. The Thunderbird changed over various eras but the Supercharged was always one of the most fun to drive (via Hot Cars).

Photo Credit: Ford

The Thunderbird Supercharged was an attempt to bring a performance aspect to the car. Unfortunately, Thunderbird traditionalists didn’t take too kindly to this performance attempt by Ford. The 300 HP option was minuscule compared to the other models being sold at the time.

Photo Credit: Hot Rod

AMC Rebel Machine

The Rebel Machine was a unique-looking muscle car, to say the least. The usual AMC V8 power plant was in place so there was no real improvement there. While AMC was going through a transitional phase, the Rebel Machine was one of the bright spots for the brand (via Hemmings).

AMC Rebel
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

It was not the most dominant muscle car on the market. Its questionable styling and reliability weren’t strong in the car’s favor. The sales numbers for the Rebel Machine were remarkably low, so the Rebel Machine didn’t have a long shelf life in the automotive industry as a result.

Dodge Demon
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Dodge Dart Demon

The Dart was a popular car for Dodge in the 1960s and ’70s. It was used increasingly as a law enforcement vehicle across the country. But there was another variation of the Dart that was popular with consumers, and that was the Demon. The Demon was a performance-minded model that brought many engine enhancements into play all of a sudden (via Classic).

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The Demon was a more performance-oriented version of the Dart. The upgraded engine gave the car markedly much more performance than the standard model. The short wheelbase and the lightweight design made the Demon fun to drive because of this, even if its interior quality was less than impressive.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Plymouth Duster 340

The Duster 340 was another muscle car that came out in the heyday. The Duster 340 had a smaller V8 engine that generated 275 HP. The performance was not groundbreaking, but it wasn’t disappointing either. The Duster 340 proved to be a success for the Plymouth brand, as it sold in respectable numbers. The Plymouth Duster gave buyers the excitement that couldn’t be found in your average two-door (via How Stuff Works).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The styling of the Duster 340 was similar to other muscle cars that Mopar was pumping out. The lightweight design coupled with a powerful V8 engine seemed to be the magic pill back then. The Duster 340 was not as impressive as its previous generations though.

Photo Credit Car Domain

Chevrolet El Camino SS

The El Camino SS was a unicorn in the auto industry. It was a car-based truck with a powerful V8 engine. The SS model shared many components with the Chevelle SS. The problem with the El Camino SS was that it didn’t gain the popularity or notoriety GM hoped for. The Chevrolet El Camino SS was a notable muscle car for several reasons and its unique styling set it apart from everything else on the market (via Hemmings).

Photo Credit: Car Gurus

The unique design of the car only resonated with a very small audience. The fact that it could only seat three also prevented many qualified buyers from opting for one. The El Camino was canceled in the late 1980s because of these influential factors.

1969 AMC AMX/3
Photo Credit: AMC

AMC AMX

The AMX was a unique muscle car because it only had two seats. The two-seater design was the only thing that differentiated the AMX from the Javelin. The 390 V8 engine produced 360 HP. Coupled with the short wheelbase of the car the AMX had better performance than other AMC models. The AMC AMX had an interesting concept, although the final product might not have been marketed most effectively (via Hemmings).

AMC AMX (1968)
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

The styling of the car was also more attractive than previous offerings by AMC. The problem was that the two-seat design of the car was limited, and consumers gravitated toward four-seat options on the market at the time.

Ford thunderbird
Photo Credit: Car Domain

Ford Fairlane Thunderbolt

The Ford Fairlane was not the first car to come to mind when it comes to a muscle car. But in 1964 Ford released a factory-built drag racer. The Fairlane Thunderbolt had an aggressive design built for the track. The 427 V8 FE came with more than enough horsepower to motivate the car with authority (via Hemmings).

Photo Credit: Auto WP

The rest of the design of the Fairlane Thunderbolt was bland. The 425 HP was impressive but not as impressive as other offerings from GM and Chrysler. The Fairlane Thunderbolt did not become a well-known muscle car in the industry as a result.

Foto Credit: Auto WP

Buick Riviera GS

Buick was not usually a brand that came up in conversations about muscle cars. But there were more than a few muscle cars that Buick released nevertheless. The most notable of which was the Riviera GS. The Rivera GS did not conform to the standard Buick design language, instead, the car was muscular and well adept at cornering and off-the-line performance (via Hemmings).

Foto Credit: Auto WP

The Riviera GS shared a platform with the Chevrolet Chevelle and the Oldsmobile Cutlass. The Riviera GS was a car built on the success of the platform, but it fell short in many other areas.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Dodge Charger Daytona

The Charger Daytona was one of the most well-known muscle cars of its era. But success wasn’t attributed to high sales numbers, but the success of the car in NASCAR. The Charger Daytona was fast, and there were very few cars that could compete with the aerodynamic design (via American Muscle Museum).

Photo Credit: Mecum

Chrysler experienced success with the Plymouth Superbird, which used a similar design. The most notable aspect of the design was the oversized wing on the back, but the aerodynamic nose of the car cannot be understated.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

Ford Mustang 289 Hi Po

If there was one thing about the muscle car era it was the rarely-ending plethora of trim packages offered. Even the Mustang had a trim package for every taste, from the budget-minded consumer to the performance-hungry one. The Ford Mustang 289 Hi Po utilized a special engine called the “K-Code” (via Motor Trend).

Ford Mustang Mach 1 - Shelby Mustang
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This engine was introduced due to the negative press regarding the Mustang’s lackluster performance. The 289 Hi Po was the friendliest option for those who wanted performance without sacrificing economy.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28

The 1967 Camaro Z/28 was built in response to the success of the Ford Mustang. The Mustang created a whole new segment of vehicles. GM countered with the Camaro and the Pontiac Firebird models. The Z/28 was the performance-oriented trim with a powerful V8 engine (via American Muscle Museum).

Photo Credit: Dealer Accelerate

The Camaro Z/28 was an immediate hit for the company. Consumers dug the stylish exterior and the solid, durable GM small block V8 engine. The Z/28 offered several styling options on the exterior and the interior of the car was fairly upmarket.

Photo Credit: Hagerty

1969 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi

Chrysler was the one carmaker that never offered a pony car. The smallest automaker out of the big three did have some success with muscle cars, though. The Charger R/T Hemi was a different-looking muscle car, thanks in part to a coke bottle design. The R/T Hemi was one of the fastest production cars at the time (via Hot Cars).

Photo Credit: Hagerty

The 426 Hemi engine was at the top of its class and in a league of its own. The Charger R/T Hemi fetches a pretty penny nowadays. There were some shortcomings with the car such as the interior styling and quality but the performance more than made up for it. There were 475 examples with the 426 V8 engine.

Foto Credit: Auto WP

Buick GSX

Although the Buick brand was not associated with the performance there were more than a few Buicks that changed the game. The GSX was one of the high-performance models that made their way onto the market. With unique styling and one-of-a-kind paint jobs, the exterior styling of the GSX was excellent (via Hemmings).

Foto Credit: Auto WP

But it was the performance of the GSX that set the car apart. The GSX was strictly designed to be a performance vehicle and there were only 678 produced. The fact that there was such a powerful Buick model was not unnoticed by the automotive world.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Yenko Camaro 427

There were all kinds of variations to the standard Camaro that were sold as specialty items. One of the most well-known specialty Camaro was the Yenko 427. Yenko was responsible for several powerful GM muscle cars, so it’s no surprise the Camaro was on that list. The Yenko 427 had several engine improvements that gave it superior horsepower and performance (via Motor Trend).

Photo Credit: Mecum

Not only was the off-the-line performance better but the car also had an improved suspension setup. GM sold the Yenko Camaro for a short period, and the car was a specialty product which means it had to be ordered from the dealership.

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Chevrolet Corvette L88

The Corvette has always gone through periods of success and doubt. The L88 was one of those periods where GM attempted to revive interest in the brand. The L88 was a performance-minded version of the Corvette and as such, it was fairly stripped down. The styling was lean and to the point (via Super Cars).

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The 427 V8 engine breathed new life into the C3 Corvette. Consumers generally downplayed the car during this generation. But the L88 was an exciting addition that gave the Corvette the type of performance to take on any muscle car.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Shelby GT 500

The late 1960s were a great time for performance cars and the Shelby GT 500 is a prime example of that. The Shelby GT 500 was one of the first cars developed from the relationship between Carroll Shelby and Ford Motor Company. The car was much faster than the standard Mustang models and it was a limited edition (via Revology).

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Today, the Shelby GT 500 remains a highly desirable ride. The base of the car was so much more powerful than the other Mustang models on the market. With the Shelby GT 500 package, the Mustang went from being a pony car to a full-on muscle car.

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Plymouth Superbird Hemi

The Plymouth Superbird Hemi was another well-known muscle car that came out from Chrysler. The Superbird experienced phenomenal success on the NASCAR circuit which prompted the company to bring it into the mainstream. The Superbird was successful in terms of sales numbers and generating interest in the brand (via Auto Evolution).

1970 Plymouth Superbird
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Of all the Plymouth models ever released, the Superbird was by far one of the most well-known. Even today the iconic look of the car with the oversized spoiler makes it stand out at any car show that you’ll see it at.

Photo Credit: Mecum

COPO Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

In the late 1960s, drag racing was popular, and the COPO Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 was designed to fly under the radar. The styling of the car was considerably dialed back, especially when you compared it to the other Camaro models on the market. The car had a lot of potential but it wasn’t enough to generate continued interest in the car (via Super Cars).

Photo Credit: Mecum

The COPO Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 was more of a specialty item and not something that the general consumer would ever want. The price tag was also a lot higher which turned a lot of consumers off when it came to choosing it.

Foto Credit: Hagerty

Pontiac Catalina 421 “Swiss Cheese”

Believe it or not, Pontiac was a successful automotive brand at one point. With the likes of cars like the Pontiac Catalina 421 “Swiss Cheese” on the market, why wouldn’t it be? The Pontiac Catalina 421 “Swiss Cheese” was a very fast car designed specifically for drag racing. The car was lightweight and had a powerful 421 V8 engine which gave it tremendous off-the-line performance (via Barrett Jackson).

Foto Credit: Hagerty

The Catalina was not the most popular car among consumers but this gave it a little boost in popularity. The overall styling of the car was attractive and there were many options that you could choose from. The Pontiac Catalina 421 “Swiss Cheese” was not the most well-known Pontiac but it might have been the most fun.

Foto Credit: Mecum

Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 LS6

The Chevelle was one of the most popular production cars General Motors ever sold. It was the perfect combination of styling and performance. The Chevelle SS 454 LS6 took the basic performance that the standard car had and turned it up a notch. The 454 was one of GM’s best V8 engines and one of the most popular at the time (via Motor Trend).

Foto Credit: Auto WP

The Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 LS6 was a heavy car with a lot of power and torque. Consumers quickly gobbled up the special edition Chevelle models. The LS6 was by far one of the rarest versions of the Chevelle and you’ll seldom see one on the road anymore. You’ll pay a pretty penny to get a Chevelle LS6 as a result.

Shelby Cobra
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Shelby Cobra 289

The Shelby Cobra 289 was probably one of the most copied cars in the world, and part of the reason for that is due to the rising popularity of “kit” cars. But there was nothing like the original, a car designed for speed and handling. Think of the Shelby Cobra 289 as the Mazda Miata but with far more power under the hood (via Hemmings).

Shelby Cobra
Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Every inch of the Shelby Cobra 289 was designed for exceptional performance. The car handles amazingly well and the line performance was great too. The Shelby Cobra 289 was among the rarest Cobra models on the road so finding one can be difficult.

Photo Credit: Pinterest

Shelby EXP500 Green Hornet

Talking about the rare and seemingly unknown, the Shelby EXP500 Green Hornet was a marvel of technology and performance. Every inch of the Shelby EXP500 Green Hornet was put together with performance in mind. But Shelby built on what was already great about the GT 500 and added his personal touches (via Motor Trend).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The green paint job might remind you of the Steve Mcqueen Mustang from the same era. The EXP 500 model was not sold to the public. There was one sold at the auction for over a million dollars. The Shelby EXP500 Green Hornet was the pinnacle of Mustang heritage and design at the time.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Plymouth Hemi Cuda Convertible

You don’t usually think of a convertible and performance in the same sentence, but that’s exactly what you got with the Hemi Cuda Convertible. The Hemi Cuda built on the success of the already existing Cuda muscle cars. The 426 Hemi engine gave the car stellar performance off the line and coupled with the convertible top, made it a unique ride (via Hagerty).

Photo Credit: Mecum

The Hemi Cuda Convertible was everything enthusiasts were looking for in a muscle car. With the performance of the V8 engine, the Hemi Cuda was a stellar addition to the already impressive MOPAR lineup.

Photo Credit: Mecum

Shelby GT500 Super Snake

The Shelby GT500 Super Snake was another rare muscle car that came out of Ford during the height of the muscle car era. The paint job was well-designed and gave the car a unique look that hadn’t been seen before. Even more, the Super Snake was an extremely rare car and as such, you’ll seldom see one on the road anymore (via Shelby).

Photo Credit: Mecum

But the GT500 Super Snake exhibited some of the best performance in the history of the Mustang line. The handling and off-the-line performance of the car was much better than anyone could have imagined. The GT500 did everything right at a time when Ford was still finding a footing in the performance world.

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Chevrolet Corvette L88 Convertible

The Corvette L88 Convertible was another rarity in the world of high-performance Chevy. Building on the success of the previous high-performance Corvette models the Chevrolet Corvette L88 Convertible was a much faster option. Collectors highly sought after the C2 thanks to its innovative styling and high performance (via GM Authority).

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There were only 20 examples of the L88 convertible put into production and one recently sold at auction for $3.2 Million. While that was a high price tag to pay for a classic Corvette model there are very few that can compete with this one. The engineering and performance of the L88 were unparalleled.

Photo Credit: Ford

Ford Mustang GT390 Bullitt

The Mustang GT390 Bullitt is one of the most famous movie cars of all time. The styling of the Ford Mustang GT390 Bullitt made it stand out from the crowd in an already flooded market. But it was the performance of the Ford Mustang GT390 Bullitt that was groundbreaking at the time (via Motor Authority).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The highly modified Mustang model was extremely rare and has sold at auction more than a few times. The car was featured in numerous movies starring Steve McQueen, and it was the forest green paint job that made it stand out. Ford renewed the Bullitt name in the future on a few Mustang models.

Photo Credit: Ford

Shelby GT 350 R

Carroll Shelby always had fun selling highly modified Mustang models to the public. That concept lived on with the Shelby GT 350 R. There were 30 of these high-performance Mustang models that went into production and each was signed by Shelby himself. The off-the-line performance of the GT 350 R was impressive to say the least (via Forbes).

Photo Credit: Car & Driver

The Shelby GT 350 R exhibited a powerful V8 engine which gave the car a fire-breathing amount of performance. The paint job and styling are unique for the period and made the car stand out compared to other Mustang models from the same period. There is no denying Shelby loved to tinker with the Mustang.

Photo Credit: Pinterest

Shelby Cobra Super Snake

If the Shelby Cobra 289 was a great car, then the Shelby Cobra Super Snake was an even better one. This is why Carroll Shelby decided to do what he did best and bring another fire-breathing Shelby model into production. The Shelby Cobra Super Snake was a powerful roadster that did everything right from the factory (via Road & Track).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The off-the-line performance was exceptional, and the styling of the car made it even more impressive. The unique striped paint job is still synonymous with the Shelby Cobra today and has made the car stand out. The performance of the Shelby Cobra Super Snake was impressive back then and carved a unique niche out for the car.

Photo Credit: RM Sotheby’s

Shelby Daytona Coupe

Carroll Shelby took everything great about the Shelby Roadster and added a hard top to it. The resulting product was a car that exhibited excellent performance numbers and handling on the track. While the design took the automotive world by storm it also handled well on the track (via Shelby).

Photo Credit: RM Sotheby’s

Thus, the Shelby Daytona Coupe was also one of the rarest cars of the time, with a notable styling and performance difference over its predecessors. The Shelby Daytona Coupe routinely fetches upwards of $3 million on the auction block just because of how rare the car was. The rarity of this car has made it an enticing piece of Shelby’s heritage.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Shelby Cobra 289 CSX 2000

What made the Shelby Cobra 289 CSX 2000 one of the rarest cars ever made? The Shelby Cobra 289 CSX 2000 was part of Carroll Shelby’s fleet for decades, but the styling of the car was much more stripped down than the production version (via Autoweek).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Because Carroll Shelby enjoyed speed, that’s exactly what the Shelby Cobra 289 CSX 2000 was built for. There are very few performance cars in the world that can drive and handle how the Shelby Cobra 289 CSX 200 does. Indeed, the 289 CSX 2000 was sold at auction for a high price, but the car remained highly coveted in the performance industry.

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