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People Think These Sports Cars Are Awesome….They Aren’t

Cameron EittreimOctober 20, 2022

The sports car segment is an ever-changing part of the automotive industry. Modern sports cars are not only more powerful but are also more feature-packed than ever before. Speed used to be something that only wealthy people could attain. But today, even the most modest sports car has power. All that aside, however, there have also been duds in the sports car market that are quite often overvalued by the people who drive them.

With the recent bubble in the auto industry, prices have been rising more than ever. The price of sports cars has gone up tremendously, especially used models. As more consumers age, they want to enjoy the cars of their childhoods. Thus the prices of cars like the Toyota Supra and the Nissan 300ZX have gone astronomical. So we looked at several sports cars that are outrageously priced but aren’t as cool as you’d think. Enjoy – or rather, don’t – right here.

Photo Credit: Ford

Ford Mustang II

How do you sell a Pinto-based Mustang? Ford did it under the guise of fuel economy. Unfortunately, the car was the furthest thing from a Mustang there was. The underpinnings of the car were almost exclusively made up of Pinto parts. Consumers weren’t too happy about this and enthusiasts didn’t want to claim the car as a Mustang (via Auto Trends).

Photo Credit: Ford

The debacle hurt the reputation of Mustang II dramatically. The car was deemed unreliable by consumers and the sales sunk. The Pinto-based Mustang has since become a collector’s item in certain circles. But there were much better sports cars from this era than the Mustang II, even if it did offer a reasonable price tag and V8 performance.

Photo Credit: Doug Demuro

Honda S2000

The S2000 was a big deal when it hit the market. Honda had never released a two-door roadster other than the compact Del Sol before the S2000. The S2000 was a solid car in a lot of ways with excellent acceleration and handling. The problem was that the S2000 was a fairly bare-bones car with limited choices when it came to options (via Motor Trend).

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Quality issues prevented it from becoming a success. Consumers who were looking for a car like the S2000 had certain expectations and it didn’t necessarily meet them. There were a lot of comparable options on the market at the time, like the Mazda Miata, which was considerably cheaper.

Photo Credit: Hot Rod

Monte Carlo SS

The Monte Carlo released in 2006 featured a dated design. But it was the first time in over a decade that GM offered the car with a V8 engine. The small block V8 engine was one of the new modern engine choices from GM. The car’s reliability wasn’t the best during this generation of the car and consumers routinely complained (via Auto Blog).

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The V6 versions of the car also had a lot of issues. The transmission failure was a major issue that GM never addressed. The car was not the most reliable and when the transmission would fail it would be a costly repair for the consumer. There is no doubt that the Monte Carlo had a lot more potential than this and the car was a lackluster choice.

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Ford Contour SVT

The Contour SVT was a car that very few people remember. It was a passion project for the SVT division and they didn’t have a lot to work with. The original Contour was undersized and underpowered compared to the competition. The Contour SVT was a fun-to-drive car, but it wasn’t worth its high price tag (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: BAT

The Contour SVT was sold in very limited numbers and you won’t see it very often. The Contour itself was not a successful model. The car was too close in size to the Escort and the price was a lot higher. It was supposed to be the face of the passenger cars at Ford but it didn’t do well. The SVT model was more hype than reality and wasn’t successful.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Dodge Magnum SRT

The Magnum wagon was an interesting concept. When other automakers had moved away from the station wagon, Dodge decided to make theirs into a sports car. The Magnum SRT wagon came with a powerful Hemi V8 engine. The Magnum was the precursor to the Dodge Charger that came out a few years later and it offered similar performance (via Hot Cars).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Magnum did not become the success that Dodge had hoped for. The problem with the car was the reliability and the limited appeal. The Magnum had a lot more hype than it was worth and Dodge realized this once the sales numbers sank even more.

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Taurus SHO V8

It’s hard to believe the Taurus SHO came with a V8 in the 1990s. Well, it did and it was one of the least reliable cars in Ford’s history. The Yamaha V8 engine had a problem with the head gasket going out prematurely. Many Taurus V8 models were past their expiration date even before they had serious miles on the odometer (via Auto Trader).

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The Taurus SHO had a lot of potential, especially considering the sleeper value of the Taurus model. But the engine was rushed into production and suffered from far too many reliability issues. Ford revised the SHO line a decade later but it never had a V8 engine again.

Photo Credit: Toyota

Scion TC

As the Mitsubishi Eclipse grew long in the tooth, Toyota saw an opening to create a new car. The TC was supposed to be the next generation of the Celica but that never came to fruition. When the TC was launched, it had a heavy advertising campaign that targeted young car shoppers. The TC had a lot to like about it but the car was fairly basic at its core (via Auto Evolution).

Photo Credit: Scion

The Scion TC didn’t break any sales records but it did manage to become a successful model for the company. There was a lot of competition in the compact car space around this time. The TC had a lot to offer in terms of design and functionality. The car just had a lot of reliability issues and build quality issues that hampered its reputation until this day.

Photo Credit: Ford

Ford Probe

The Probe was a comical concept because it was designed to take the place of the Mustang in the Ford lineup. There was such a public outcry that the Probe was released as its own car. But the Probe never had the chance to take market share from the Mustang (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

The Probe had some decent aspects to it. The styling was reasonable at the time and the interior was spacious all things considered. But when it came to reputation and performance the Probe fell short in both departments. For a car that was supposed to take the place of the Mustang, the Probe was lacking that special something.

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Lincoln LS

The folks at Ford thought a V8-powered Lincoln sedan was a great idea. The problem with the Lincoln LS was the fact that it shared its underpinnings with the Jaguar S-Type. The S-Type was notoriously unremarkable and the LS was too. There was not a lot to like about the car, including the fact that the V8 model didn’t come with the stick shift (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Lincoln LS didn’t sell very well and a big part of the reason for that was the lackluster reliability. There were a lot of options on the market at this time and most people weren’t focused on Lincoln. The LS had dated styling and a lot of consumers were turned off by it.

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Chevrolet Impala SS

The same thing goes for the modern rendition of the Impala SS. Sure it had a V8 engine, but the build quality was lackluster at best. The automotive press criticized the car because of its styling. Its small-block V8 wasn’t the most powerful thing around either. GM tweaked the design of the car but it didn’t do much to bolster the sales (via KBB).

2006 Chevrolet Impala SS
Photo Credit: GM

Nowadays these cars have acquired far too many miles and the prices are rising. With the high cost of repairs, there is little to no reason to get an Impala SS from this era. Other sedans had a V8 engine that would provide just as much fun. Some would say GM dropped the ball when they attempted to revive the Impala SS nameplate.

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Infiniti G35 Coupe

The G35 coupe was a popular car in the early 2000s. Released during the revitalization of Nissan under Carlos Ghosn, it was sporty and modern. The styling of the G35 was excellent back then, but the car has aged considerably. The G35 has been around for 20 years and even a well-maintained one is no spring chicken (via KBB).

Photo Credit: Nissan

Used prices for G35s have continued to rise. Part of this is because the car was popular in the tuner community. The G35 also shared much of its components with the Nissan Z, which meant parts were interchangeable. But the G35 has a lot of issues and age will only worsen these with time.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

2006 MazdaSpeed 6

The MazdaSpeed 6 was another sports car from the early 2000s. The design of the car was stylish and fast, two things that worked well. But the build quality was not the best, as was the case with most Mazdas from that era. This meant that used examples of the MazdaSpeed 6 had a lot of reliability issues. From the transmission failing to the head gaskets needing work, there was a plethora of problems with it (via Edmunds).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Mazda 6 replaced the Millennia as the midsize sedan. The MazdaSpeed version of the sedan added to the performance and dressed the car up a bit. But back then consumers were still weary of the cars Mazda sold. Only the Miata that was popular back then, and the MazdaSpeed 6 had a tough road to follow.

Photo Credit: Mazda

MazdaSpeed 3

The MazdaSpeed 3 was a more popular option than the MazdaSpeed 6. For starters, the 3 was compact and had a much better powertrain. For consumers who wanted something fast and affordable the MazdaSpeed 3 checked every box. Few cars could do what the MazdaSpeed 3 did in the same price range (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: MAZDA

But time has not been nice to the MazdaSpeed 3 and the reliability of the first generation models was questionable. These cars had numerous issues like overheating and transmission. The MazdaSpeed 3 had a stellar reputation and street enthusiasts still swear by the car, but it just wasn’t that good.

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Dodge Caliber SRT

The Caliber and performance in the same sentence don’t even make sense. But somehow Chrysler managed to sell a sports version of this ugly hatchback. It had an SRT badge on it no less and the car was the replacement for the Neon SRT. The Caliber SRT was nothing short of agonizing to look at and the performance was lethargic at best (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Chrysler

The Caliber SRT was not a success and the sales were minimal. The car was released during an economic recession and the build quality just wasn’t there. Although there is a portion of enthusiasts that swear by this car it just didn’t cut the mustard. There were far better options for the price than the Caliber SRT, its aged design and lackluster build quality were shortcomings.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

Dodge SRT-4

The Neon SRT-4 was a car that made a big splash. The car had a lot going for it with a cheap price tag and decent performance. The problem with the car was that it was still just a Neon at its core and that meant the build quality was lackluster at best. The SRT-4 was a quick-witted car with a lot of potential at the time (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Chrysler

But as time went on, the lack of quality became apparent and the Neon SRT-4 was no more. The Neon underpinnings still made the car quite troublesome in the quality department. Even with the added boost in performance and styling it still had all of the Neon shortcomings. Nevertheless, in recent years, the SRT-4 became quite an expensive collector’s item.

Mitsubishi Lancer EVO
Photo Credit: Edmunds

Mitsubishi Lancer Evo

The Lancer EVO was another car from the 2000s that built up more of a reputation than it deserved. The car was never as well put together as the Subaru WRX STI. Yet the price tag for the Lancer Evo continued to rise. The EVO had a lot of the same underpinnings as the standard Lancer. The build quality for that car wasn’t that good and that lack of quality came through on the EVO (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Even though the price for an EVO was thousands more, it couldn’t compete with the WRX STI. The Lancer was more of a novelty item and something that very few drivers could afford. When you got behind the wheel of a Lancer EVO the car wasn’t that great. There were honestly better cars in the same price range as the EVO.

Photo Credit: Motor Trend

Acura Integra Type-R

Honda was never shy about letting the world know that the Integra was nothing more than a dressed-up Civic. In fact, in Canada and other parts of the world, the Civic is sold as the Integra. So when the values of the Integra Type R started rising, it caused concern. The car was reliable but it was not a high-end luxury car in any sense of the word (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Motor1

The performance of the Integra Type R was not even that great. What the car had going for it was bulletproof reliability and a steadfast revving engine that was easy to work on. The Integra was not the be-all and end-all of performance that Honda would like you to think it was. The build quality of the car was cheap at best and quite basic.

Hyundai Genesis G70 via Motor Junkie
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Hyundai Genesis

The Genesis was the third attempt by Hyundai to market a high-end luxury car to the public. You could say in some ways it worked successfully as the car did sell quite well. But the first generation of the Genesis has a reputation for being a trouble-prone car. There were a lot of reliability and build quality issues that went on with that first generation (via Car & Driver).

Hyundai Genesis GT Coupe
Photo Credit: Hyundai

Because the car was still fairly unknown in the automotive repair world, finding a way to rectify its problems was difficult. Most of the Genesis models that were on the used car market racked up a lot of mileage and were not well taken care of. The Genesis had more of a positive reputation than it deserved due to its countless quality issues.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Hyundai Azera

The Azera had the same problem as the Genesis and many other high-end models the brand tried to market. It was another attempt at Hyundai to enter the premium market. But the car was designed way before Hyundai was even considered a premium automaker. The Azera did have some decent performance and an upscale interior, but it wasn’t enough to bolster the car’s second-rate image (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The Azera made a great used luxury car if you weren’t looking for performance. But as a sport sedan, the car fell short in several areas. The styling was bland at best and the factory options were seemingly outdated compared to the other cars in the segment. There is no denying that the Azera was hyped up way more than it was worth.

Photo Credit: Hyundai

2001 Hyundai Tiburon

The Tiburon was the first real attempt at Hyundai to market a sporty two-door. Before the Tiburon, you had the Hyundai Scoupe but that was not worth much of anything. The Tiburon came with a turbocharged engine and reasonable horsepower for the price. The problem was that the build quality of the Tiburon was not all that great (via Car & Driver).

Hyundai Tiburon
Photo Credit: Hyundai

The second generation of the Tiburon was a much better car than the previous model. But there was still a lot that was left to be desired. There was a lot of competition in the compact sports car space, and industry leaders like the Scion TC offered a more compelling product. Nevertheless, the Tiburon is more hype than it’s worth.

Photo Credit: Hyundai

1996 Hyundai Tiburon

The first generation of the Tiburon was a vast improvement over the Hyundai Scoupe that came before it. The Scoupe was an odd-shaped car that had no type of sports capability whatsoever. The Tiburon was a refreshing car that had a brand-new exterior style. Hyundai changed the consumer perception of the brand with the first-generation Tiburon (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

The Tiburon was initially popular with buyers due to the cheap price tag. But the lackluster build quality soon showed up. The Tiburon was not the most well-built car on the road, and there were a lot of issues with the quality. Hyundai offered a warranty from the factory but it didn’t do much to remedy the quality problems that owners were facing.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

2007 Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder

The 2007 Eclipse Spyder was big news when it was first introduced. The Eclipse Spyder was a popular car for the brand. There was a good portion of Eclipse buyers who only bought the car for the convertible version. It was marketed as the sporty upmarket version of the coupe, but in reality, it wasn’t much of an upgrade (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

Besides its attractive styling, the Mitsubishi models from this period were not the most reliable cars on the road. The Spyder was initially a successor to the brand but that quickly changed in the used car world. The repairs on the Spyder were more expensive than most owners anticipated. Thus, there are more than a few used examples on the market.

Photo Credit: Edmunds

2006 Mitsubishi Eclipse

The 2006 Eclipse was part of a full redesign and a total re-imagination of the Eclipse brand as a whole. The car was redesigned from the ground up with a new modern design. The design was almost reminiscent of the Nissan 350Z. The car was initially very popular with consumers but then its shortcomings of it started to show up (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

This Eclipse suffered from overheating and other issues. The build quality of the car wasn’t the best and it showed after a short time on the road. Mitsubishi addressed some of the issues but for the most part, the car was a lot more issue prone than the previous generation. The Eclipse was built on the principle of being an affordable compact that was fun to drive.

Photo Credit: Toyota

2000 Toyota Celica

The 2000 Celica was not the carefree car that it had been in previous generations. Toyota redesigned the car from the ground up to appeal to new car buyers. The styling was unlike anything else that was in the lineup at the time. The problem was that the improvements were only skin deep and the Celica didn’t offer much pep in its step (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Toyota

The previous generations of the Celica offered unique features like AWD. But this generation of cars was pretty bland in that department. There wasn’t much to offer and it fell short in the way of consumers. The car lacked the horsepower and performance sports car shoppers wanted. It was a bland coupe that didn’t vibe well with consumers.

Photo Credit: Car Gurus

2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder

The 2000 MR2 Spyder did a great job of offering a deal when it came to a roadster. The engineered design and affordable price were a golden ticket for consumers. But the design of the car was fairly limited and dated by the 2000s. Toyota didn’t advertise the MR2 very much so only the enthusiasts knew about the car even being on the market at the time (via Car & Driver).

Sports car - Toyota MR2
Photo Credit: Toyota

There were some cool aspects about the Spyder such as the refreshing paint colors and the upmarket interior. But it wasn’t enough to sell the car and keep it viable. Toyota teased a return of the MR2 but so far this was the last generation of the car. There is no denying that the MR2 was more hyped than it should have been back then.

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Lexus SC400

The Lexus SC400 was the first two-door luxury car that was sold by the new Lexus brand. The car was over-engineered which resulted in a quiet ride and excellent performance. But in recent years that has caused the SC400 to get a better reputation than it deserves. Most of the time these cars have been heavily abused and the interiors are trashed (via Car & Driver).

Photo Credit: Hagerty

Not to mention that it’s incredibly hard to find an SC400 that has less than 200K on the clock. The SC400 was a car that had a whole lot of success when it was new. But the used examples of the car are way past their prime and it’s almost impossible to find a clean low mileage example anymore. The SC400 was way overhyped for what was essentially a 30-year-old car.

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Chrysler Crossfire

The Crossfire was another car that was designed by the company in the 2000s. The car was based on the Mercedes SLK underneath. The problem with that was that the design was quite dated by the time it made it to the market in the form of the Crossfire. The questionable styling of the car caused it to get some negative press from the automotive community (via Autoblog).

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The performance of the Crossfire wasn’t bad but it wasn’t what Chrysler hyped it up to be. The sales of the Crossfire were poor and the reliability was questionable. There were some strange features such as a wing that would only come up at 40 MPH. The general design of the Crossfire was something that was better left alone by most consumers.

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1997 Audi A8

The A8 has always been considered the hidden jewel of 1990s Audi design by most. But that doesn’t mean that the car is without its faults. The Audi A8 is a car that makes a lot of sense from a luxury standpoint. But from a used car standpoint the A8 costs more than it’s worth. The reliability of the A8 was questionable at best and the parts are expensive to repair (via Edmunds).

Photo Credit: Audi

The A8 coupe is still a beautiful car, but it has a lot of faults. The engine had head gasket failures early on and the transmission has also been known to go. The A8 has an inflated reputation in the performance community but that doesn’t mean that the car is good. There were better vehicles from this era that you could get for the price.

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Lexus LS400

The LS400 was a massive project undertaken by Toyota and they spent millions on it. But the investment paid off because the LS400 was a success for the company. The LS400 was a well-built luxury sedan with a powerful V8 engine. But the LS400 nowadays is a used car that generally has a lot of miles on the clock (via Car Gurus).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

Most of the LS400 models that are for sale have high mileage and the interior is far from perfect. The quality of the car isn’t so great that it’s worth taking on that much of a project. Not to mention the repairs are quite costly, especially if the vacuum lines start going out. The LS400 was a stellar car at the start but nowadays should be avoided.

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Porsche Boxster

The Boxster was the first “affordable” Porsche. The thinking behind the car was to get more consumers into a Porsche dealership. Because the Boxster was an affordable car back then it has maintained an affordable price tag today. The problem was that the Boxster was not the most well-built car on the road and there were a lot of quality issues (via Motor Trend).

Photo Credit: Streetside Classics

The engine has numerous issues which include overheating and timing chain failure. While the thought of driving a Porsche might be exhilarating, this one will bring heartache. The Boxster was lacking every ounce of the quality that goes into a Porsche product. The Boxster was improved over the years, but not enough to warrant buying it as a used car.

Photo Credit: Automobile

Mercedes-Benz 500E

The 500E was one of the most popular Mercedes models from that era. The car had the styling and luxury that you’d expect in a Benz. There were plenty of electric luxury items built into the car that made it comfortable to live with. But as with any used car, a lot of those electric items start to go bad and can be costly to replace (via Motor Trend).

Photo Credit: Automobile

The quality of the 500E was not the best and unless you have money to plunk down this car is going to be expensive to repair. There were various of the 500E body but they all used the same engine and power-train. These cars also had a lackluster interior with cheap pieces that ripped and broke easily. There were better-used car options that came out of this era for a sports car fix.

Jaguar XJS
Photo Credit: Hagerty

Jaguar XJS

The XJS was a forgotten sports car, and with good reason. As with most Jaguar products from that era, it was incredibly unreliable. Not to mention the styling looked dated even when the car was brand-new. There was a lot to like about the XJS but it just didn’t outweigh the negatives that the car had, such as its lack of reliability (via Car Survey).

Jaguar XJS
Photo Credit: Hagerty

The XJS was not a sales success for the brand and by the 1990s the car was tired, to say the least. There were so many different sports cars on the market around that time that it doesn’t make sense to pick this one. The XJS will still cost a lot of money to repair and the value of the car just didn’t justify that kind of investment by a new owner.

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Chevrolet Corvette C4

The Corvette C4 was a car that was on the market for over a decade. The car had quite a few different incarnations over that period. There were aspects of the car that consumers hated and a lot of aspects that they liked. But the C4 was among one of the worst generations of the Corvette ever built (via Car Survey).

Photo Credit: Bring A Trailer

GM cars and trucks from this era were known for their lack of quality. The Corvette had everything from leaking T-Tops to door panels that didn’t match. The earlier engines were also not the most reliable as GM was still testing out the new emissions technology. There were better cars from this era that could compete with the Corvette in terms of cost and performance.

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Volkswagen Phaeton

The Phaeton was a car that was specially designed from the ground up. The car was such an impressive project that Volkswagen dedicated a special factory to it alone. The Phaeton was expensive though and it didn’t sell well at all. The engine was hand built and it shared a lot of components with Bentley which meant the cost of repairs was high (via Top Gear).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

The Phaeton was a rarity when it was brand new and that is still the case. There are very few of these cars that are still on the market. The engine was very powerful and the car had a lot going for it. But every aspect of the Phaeton is a premium car that is expensive to own. There were much better options from this era in this price range.

Bentley Arnage
Photo Credit: Motor Trend

Bentley Arnage

The Bentley of the bling era was quite popular, appearing in hundreds of music videos. There was a lot to like about the Arnage, but at the end of the day, it was a Bentley and had repair costs that were unforgiving. The Arnage was a sales success for the brand and it had a lot going for it in terms of design and performance (via What Car).

Photo Credit: Bentley

But when it comes to a high-performance sports car, the Arnage cost a high-performance price tag to keep it on the road. The Bentley engineering is expensive to fix and the Arnage was not the most reliable piece of machinery on the road. There were a lot of competitors from this period that would cost less than the Arnage and offer more bang for the buck.

2003 Aston Martin DB7 Vantage - Aston Martin Short Chassis Volante
Photo Credit: Edmunds

Aston Martin DB7

The DB7 was one legendary sports car that came out in the 1990s. Surprisingly, the styling of the car is still familiar to current Aston Martins. The car had a sort of timeless look to it that has aged well. The problem with the DB7 was how much the maintenance was to keep it on the road. Now that the car is older that is still a problem for most owners who find one for a good deal (via Car Survey).

Photo Credit: Edmunds

The DB7 was a success in every sense of the word but as a used car it should be avoided. The cost to maintain a DB7 is more than most are willing to spend. There were far better options that were available around this period. The 1990s were a special time for the sports car segment and there were all kinds of top-notch models on the market.

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Infiniti Q45

The Infiniti Q45 was a revered sports sedan in the JDM community. Although the sales numbers were never impressive, those who knew about the Q45 were quite impressed. The big V8-powered sedan fought against Lexus and BMW offerings on the luxury market. As with any Infiniti product, the idea behind the Q45 was that it would be marketed as a sports sedan (via Consumer Reports).

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There was a lot to like about the Q45 but that has quickly faded over the years. The sedans that are around just weren’t taken care of by their owners. The proximity to other Nissan vehicles meant that a lot of these cars were parted out. The Q45 also had issues with overheating and the transmission failing which would prove to be an expensive fix.

Dodge Stealth
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Dodge Stealth R/T Turbo

The Stealth R/T Turbo was the fruit of a long-standing partnership between Chrysler and Mitsubishi in the 1990s. The Stealth R/T Turbo had everything that you’d expect the turbo-powered car to have. But there were a lot of issues with the car as well. Being that the car shared almost every aspect with the 3000GT, it had a lot of the same issues (via Driving Line).

Sports car - Car
Photo Credit: Edmunds

Because of the twin-turbo, the Stealth R/T was heavily hyped in the JDM community. The problem is that the turbo is not that reliable and repairs can be expensive. A lot of these cars have been mistreated and taking care of all of the issues was and is not cheap. There were a lot of comparable turbo-powered cars from this era that were much more reliable.

Photo Credit: Car Domain

Audi S4

The S4 was a compact car that had a lot of attitude. The Audi brand dominates around the world in the rally circuit and this car is part of the reason for that. The problem with the S4 was that it was not the most reliable Audi on the road. These cars spent more time in the shop than on the road. But consumers who own the S4 enjoyed it so much that they put up with the high price of maintenance (via The Truth About Cars).

Photo Credit: Car Domain

The S4 had a lot to offer such as unique styling and quick performance. But when it comes to paying that much money to maintain a vehicle, paying a highly inflated sale price doesn’t make sense. The Audi was not the only performance wagon from this era. The fact that it was available in a wagon didn’t help matters much either.

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