Home Design Tips Custom Cars That Chip Foose and Danny Koker Got Horribly Wrong
Design Tips

Custom Cars That Chip Foose and Danny Koker Got Horribly Wrong

Cameron Eittreim November 8, 2023

Photo Credit: SEMA

Custom 1970 Plymouth Barracuda “Terracuda”

Foose loves to design and build custom Mopar models and the Terracuda was evidence of that. But once again he missed the boat when it came to the design and there was much left to be desired. The main thing about the car that stood out was the root beer brown paint job. It had brown and gold lettering all over it and bold-looking wheels. The problem was that the design was too extreme for what the Barracuda was, but that was what Foose was going for with the design (via Mens Gear).

Photo Credit: SEMA

The Terracuda had a lot of things that made it unique but it just wasn’t the best of Foose’s work. He’d built other custom rides that really resonated better with the community. The overall design of the Terracuda had a lot of unique attributes to it, but it seemed Foose got a little too excited with his sketchbook. Nevertheless, the Terracuda was not the notable Foose concept that the famed designer hoped for.

Photo Credit: My Hot Cars

Speedbird

When Ford brought the Thunderbird back to the market in 2003 there was a lot of hoopla around it. The car already had a notable look to it which made the design quite unique. But Foose took things a bit further and did a sketched design that changed up the basic look of the car. Obviously, the sleek look was still there but now the car had a notable sleekness to it (via Chip Foose).

Photo Credit: My Hot Cars

The problem was that he chopped the car so low that it didn’t look like anything original. The cheap rims only took away from the overall look of the car and that didn’t help things either. The silver paint was bland, to say the least, and the interior was pretty much left alone. Overall, the Speedbird wasn’t the car Foose hoped it would be.

Photo Credit: Chip Foose

Grandmaster

The Chip Foose Grandmaster, in spite of its high price tag and designer pedigree, leaves much to be desired when it comes to styling. The vehicle’s design appears to be an overblown exercise in excess, with an overabundance of unnecessary curves, angles, and embellishments that detract from its overall aesthetic appeal. It’s a prime example of style over substance, as the excessive detailing and ornamentation overshadow any sense of cohesiveness in the design, making it look gaudy and ostentatious (via Chip Foose).

Photo Credit: Chip Foose

Moreover, the Chip Foose Grandmaster’s design choices seem to prioritize form over function, resulting in a vehicle that is impractical and uncomfortable to drive. Its cramped interior and visibility issues due to the overly-styled bodywork make it a less-than-ideal choice for practical transportation.

Photo Credit: Chip Foose

Stallion

When Foose showcased the Stallion at various car shows on the circuit, it received a lukewarm reception to say the least. Despite the hype and anticipation surrounding a creation bearing Foose’s name, the Stallion failed to generate the enthusiasm and admiration one would expect. Many attendees and automotive enthusiasts found themselves underwhelmed by the design and features of the vehicle (via Chip Foose).

Photo Credit: Chip Foose

Critics and visitors expressed their disappointment with the Stallion’s design, describing it as an attempt to merge classic and contemporary elements that didn’t quite hit the mark. Some pointed out that the styling lacked a cohesive vision and came across as a mishmash of conflicting ideas.

Photo Credit: Foose

32 5 Window

The Chip Foose 32 5-Window falls short in the aesthetics department. Its design has been widely criticized for missing the mark, with many describing it as simply ugly. Foose’s modifications have been seen as excessive and have detracted from the classic, timeless appeal of the original 1932 Ford Model B (via Chip Foose).

Photo Credit: Foose

It’s a case of overdesigning that results in an unattractive and overstyled appearance, failing to capture the essence of the original classic car. There were much better designs that came from Foose.

Photo Credit: Mecum

Danny Koker – 1956 Chevy Stepside

Koker’s 1956 Chevy Stepside, with its bold black paint job adorned with red flames and rather bland metal-looking rims, has often been criticized for its over-the-top design. The combination of the black paint and the fiery red flames can be seen as a jarring clash of styles (via Hot Cars).

Photo Credit: Mecum

Ultimately, Koker’s ambitious design choices might be appreciated by some, but for many traditionalists and classic truck enthusiasts, it’s a case of overdesign that diminishes the original charm of the 1956 Chevy Stepside.

Photo Credit: Treaper Performance

Danny Koker – 1966 Mustang GT350

Koker’s 1966 Mustang GT350 has raised some eyebrows due to its unconventional body modifications and questionable choice of black and gray rims. The custom body effects added to this classic muscle car have often been seen as odd and discordant, straying from the original design’s sleek look (via Hot Cars).

Photo Credit: Treaper Performance

In addition to the peculiar body effects, the decision to equip the vehicle with black and gray rims has been met with criticism. These rims, while potentially intended to lend a modern touch, appear drab and lack the finesse associated with such a legendary car.

Photo Credit: Mecum

Danny Koker – 1973 Buick Riviera

The 1973 Buick Riviera restored in the Count’s Kustoms garage stands out as one of the most notorious projects, but not necessarily for the right reasons. The paint job on this car goes far beyond extravagant, bordering on garish. Despite the car’s elaborate appearance, the longer you gaze at it, the more flaws and outlandish details you notice (via Hot Cars).

Photo Credit: Mecum

From the roof to the tires and wheels, the excessive efforts to achieve perfection have resulted in a car that appears more like an overindulgent art project than a well-executed car restoration.

Photo Credit: Counts Customs

Danny Koker – 1974 Roadrunner

Despite its lightweight design and supposed power, the 1974 Roadrunner has never managed to shake off its reputation as an unattractive and uninspiring vehicle. Over the years, this car has failed to maintain the sought-after status it once enjoyed. As a budget-friendly muscle car, the Roadrunner may have attracted some loyal followers (via Hot Cars).

Photo Credit: Counts Customs

Koker’s attempts to put a signature touch on this project at the Count’s Kustoms shop haven’t managed to salvage the Roadrunner’s unfortunate distinction as an ugly and unimpressive vehicle.

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