1. Chevrolet Suburban

The Suburban is the longest-serving nameplate in car history with the first model under this name emerging in 1935. But right from the start, the Suburban defined itself as a people carrier in a body style closer to a minivan than to a regular wagon or SUV. During the ‘50s and ‘60s, the Suburban moved to a truck platform, benefiting from its advanced construction, tough suspension and a long list of engines and options.

At the same time, Chevrolet started introducing the all-wheel-drive option for its truck line, so the Suburban could come with AWD, as well. This was the moment when the Suburban became an off-road model. The all-wheel-drive option proved popular during later generations. In fact, it became an almost mandatory option for the famous, long-serving seventh generation, which they introduced in 1973 and discontinued in 1991.